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Building Chords out of scales

Music Theory
chcrush27  
5 Jan 2008 19:24 | Quote
United States
Posts: 51
How do you build chords out of scales? And scales from chords not power chords but actual chords.
KicknGuitar  
5 Jan 2008 20:39 | Quote
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
Lessons: 6
Karma: 1
Take a look at the lessons page,
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_lessons.php

There is my lesson on triads (Major, Minor, Augmented, Diminished),
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=28

and Guitarslinger has a quick look at major and minor
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=14
chcrush27  
5 Jan 2008 22:41 | Quote
United States
Posts: 51
On your lesson Kicknguitar The p1 is the base note of the chord correct? And that should determine the tone of the chord...? So could triads also be known as power chord or is it a totally different thing.
chcrush27  
5 Jan 2008 23:32 | Quote
United States
Posts: 51
Also are the chords played in the Hanger 18 intro triads and is he playing arpegios between the intro and the verse
KicknGuitar  
6 Jan 2008 00:48 | Quote
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
Lessons: 6
Karma: 1
A Perfect 1st is the tonic. It is not always the bass note of a chord. But don't fret about that until later. If you have a chord that says Emin, the bass note is the tonic (what note it says in the front, "E" in this case). If the bass note is not the tonic, the chord name slightly changes (i.e. G is the "Bass note," G/Emin)

I didn't do a lesson per se on what are diads or any other chord besides triads but Triads are three different interval chords. Triads may have two M3 or four P1 but as long as it follows the formula (1-3-5) they are triads.
Here Chcrush. If you can use the major scale to figure out chords (if not that's fine, keep working at theory, it'll come), Tell me what intervals are in a "G Power chord."
(Use the Major scale starting on the root, which in this case is G, third fret)


"G Power Chord"
E|-----||
B|-----||
G|-----||
D|--5--||
A|--5--||
E|--3--||

As a hint if you can't get it, this Power chord used two of one of the intervals.

Got them? If you were able to dissect it fully, you should have found a P1, a P5 and P1(P8). This has only two different intervals, instead of three, so it can not be a triad. Two note chords are known as Diads.

If you had trouble with understanding how to find the intervals, don't worry about diads and triads, just learn how to use the major scale to find intervals in Root position chords.

chcrush, I don't have the tab in front of me but some of the intro chords from Hanger 18 are definitely triads the first is a Dmin, and the piece in between do contain arpeggios.

Incase you are, Don't get confused that triads are only 3 notes. They contain 3 different intervals but may have multiple notes of each interval. An open E Major chord can contain 6 notes but only have three different intervals The intervals that make up a major chord, a major triad. P1 M3 P5.

Hope this helps you out in someway or another if not all together.
chcrush27  
6 Jan 2008 01:03 | Quote
United States
Posts: 51
OK So It doesen't deal the number of notes played it is the numaber of tones played so a diad like the one above contains two of the same notes just different octaves and it can have two of the strings playing the same note just on a different degree. As long as they are in the same scale.
Afro_Raven  
6 Jan 2008 08:56 | Quote
Joined: way back
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Lessons: 1
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Moderator
KicknGuitar says:
If the bass note is not the tonic, the chord name slightly changes (i.e. G is the "Bass note," G/Emin)


Where you have a split chord such as this, it is always written with the chord name first, followed by the bass note, i.e. Em/G

Afro
chcrush27  
6 Jan 2008 13:00 | Quote
United States
Posts: 51
Tight Thx
chcrush27  
6 Jan 2008 13:04 | Quote
United States
Posts: 51
You would think that I would know this stuff because both my parents are majors in Music at UCI.
KicknGuitar  
6 Jan 2008 16:31 | Quote
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
Lessons: 6
Karma: 1
Woops, I rarely right out those inversions. Thanks for the catch Afro.

Haha, we all start somewhere chcrush
chcrush27  
6 Jan 2008 16:33 | Quote
United States
Posts: 51
hehe thanks for the help everyones giving me and since guitarslinger hasn't answered my question in scales can either of you take a look? Thx in advance.
Taylor  
31 Jan 2009 11:37 | Quote
Joined: 01 Jan 2009
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 1
don't be afraid to ask your parents about this theory stuff. you'll be likely to get information we might not be able to provide.
Guitarslinger124  
2 Feb 2009 11:13 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
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hey man, sorry i didnt answer your question. I'm not sure where you posted the question.
JazzMaverick  
2 Feb 2009 14:32 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
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Moderator
Depends on what you're trying to achieve out of the scale.

Basics for these individual scales:

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=123

High Beginner - Low Intermediate:

www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=138

Remember, Arpeggios (sweeps) are chords!

www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=136

That should help you out for now.
Mart903  
11 Dec 2009 19:38 | Quote
Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Karma
Hi to all!

I suggest you learn the intervals, in chords and scales as well.
In an attempt to shed some light on the subject, let me just share with you a few examples I used in response to a similar need in another thread of this forum: Sometimes a scale will match or go along with all the notes in your chord progression.- Ex A - Other times you will see that more than one scale will be needed to match or go along with all notes in the progression. For example: One scale for the first two chords in a 5 chord progression and another scale over the other three chords as in Ex B - And sometimes you will even have to use a scale for only one chord of the progression as in Ex C.

Ex.A

Chord Progression: C Am Dm G

C = R 3 5 = C E G goes along with C Major Scale: C,D,E,F,G,A,B
Am = R b3 5 = A C E goes along with C Major Scale: C,D,E,F,G,A,B
Dm = R b3 5 = D F A goes along with C Major Scale: C,D,E,F,G,A,B
G = R 3 5 = G B D goes along with C Major Scale: C,D,E,F,G,A,B

Ex.B

Chord Progression: C Dm E A B

C Dm -- C Major Scale: C,D,E,F,G,A,B
E A B -- E Major Scale: E,F#,G#,A,B,C#,D#

E = E,G#,B
A = A,C#,E
B = B,D#,F#

Ex.C


Chord Progression: G Cm D

G = G,B,D -- G Major Scale
D = D,F#,A -- G Major Scale
Cm = C,Eb,G -- Bb Major Scale

G Major Scale = G,A,B,C#,D,E,F#,
Bb Major Scale = Bb,C,D,Eb,F,G,A

Note:For each one of these situations there are other scales that may work as well.

Check out "Guitar Chords Workshop Requests" at: http://www.squidu.com/Guitar-Lessons-903
carlsnow  
12 Dec 2009 08:56 | Quote
Joined: 29 Apr 2009
United States
Lessons: 2
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In the most basic sense:

->Chords and scales are **one and the same, in a very practical sense and serve a common goal—the treatment of sound within a space.

-> Think of a Scale as an 'outline' of the chord(s) it contains—a 'chord in motion' so to speak.

-> Conversely; imagine a Chord as a 'static representation of a scale'(or scales).

(**This is why many Jazz(etc) musical-biographies and studies mention, for the sake of this post, Miles Davis playing Chords on his Trumpet)


RAWK!
Cs

JustJeff  
12 Dec 2009 15:14 | Quote
Joined: way back
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Can we do something about reviving posts from over a year ago?
Mart903  
18 Dec 2009 12:48 | Quote
Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Karma
Mart903 says:
Sorry-Correction:http://www.squidoo.com/Guitar-Lessons-903


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