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Yep, at last, something that Afro doesn't know the answer to!

Music Theory
Afro_Raven  
31 Aug 2007 11:21 | Quote
Joined: way back
United Kingdom
Lessons: 1
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Moderator
Hi guys!
The above title is not meant to sound arrogant, in case you were wondering...

Just wanted to know why it is that you can play minor scales (incl. the minor pentatonic) over a sus2 chord? The fact that it hasn't got a minor 3rd means that it should have a major tonality, and yet both major and minor scales fit equally well over the top. Can anyone explain why?

Ta,
Afro
bodom  
31 Aug 2007 17:45 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Lessons: 4
Karma: 5
Its because your not playing any third with the chord so therefore it can be ethier minor or major. Just like power chords can be heard as major or minor. Instead of playing the third, which determines if its major or minor, you play the 2nd.
Doz  
1 Sep 2007 05:15 | Quote
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United Kingdom
Karma: 10
Ah, I was going to guess that... but I'm not brilliant at my sus2 chords at the minute.
Afro_Raven  
2 Sep 2007 12:06 | Quote
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United Kingdom
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Moderator
Brilliant, thanks for answering that - I thought it would be something to do with the missing 3rd.

Ta,
Afro
iqo_riffai  
7 Oct 2007 13:59 | Quote
France
Posts: 12
altho i knw lots bout theory but i still dont knw an answer 2 ur question so i jst use suspended chords 2 "raise or dull" the spirit of another chord for example strum ur D chord nd then change 2 Dsus2 nd Dsus4 itll sound poppy nd "happy" nd doin the same with a Dm chord will make it darker..
shredguitar17  
21 Mar 2008 09:18 | Quote
Joined: 03 Feb 2008
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 7
sounds logical. I am not to prone to suspended chords, or any 7th's. I was more trained in triad and scales. but sounds right to me.


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