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is it possible?

Technique
guitarbadass  
23 Oct 2009 00:17 | Quote
Joined: 04 Oct 2009
United States
Karma: 1
to solo over more than one chord with just one scale,for example if i used the d5,e5,g5, can i use the d dorian mode over this as long as its all in the same time signature and i target out the notes in the chords in the solo,for example if the progression goes like this,i can,t figuar out how 2 write tabs on here so i,ll try 2 explain as best as i can,so here it goes its in 4\4 time the d5 power chord 8 times,which r 8th notes,now here i know i can just play the dm scale over this,but when it switchs to the e5 chord its the the same as the d5 chord its 8 8th notes,can,t i just stay with the dm scale as long as i throw in the e and b notes in the solo?why would,nt that fit,and then the same with the g5 chord,the 5th in the g5 is d so that automatically fit would,nt it?can i do this and it make since theory wise?if so lemme know,,,,,,,,,,,thanx
Guitarslinger124  
23 Oct 2009 04:45 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
United States
Lessons: 12
Licks: 42
Karma: 38
Moderator
Yes you can. Like I've told you before, those chords contain notes that are related. Let me show you:




d5 - D >>>Root
A >>>5th

e5 - E >>>Root
B >>>5th

g5 - G >>>Root
D >>>5th

D Dorian - D E F G A B & C



As you can see, they all share the same notes. Also, D Dorian is in the key of C Major So you can play any other modes in that key. I would recommend:



D Dorian - D E F G A B C
E Phrygian - E F G A B C D
G Mixolydian - G A B C D E F
A Aeolian - A B C D E F G
B Locrian - B C D E F G A






guitarbadass  
23 Oct 2009 10:48 | Quote
Joined: 04 Oct 2009
United States
Karma: 1
hey thanx,but i just don,t like to go through that many scales in one solo,i,ve broken down alot of solos and i,ve never seen 6 or all 7 modes in it,and i play alot of heavy metal and thrash metal at fast tempos which would make it about impossible to change the scale to the key of a different chord when the chord is played with a 16th note and goes back to the root chord or another chord in the progression,so why does everybody try 2 tell me to use so many modes in one solo when its ok to use just one scale over a couple of chords?,,,,,,lemme know,,,,thanx
BodomBeachTerror  
23 Oct 2009 11:10 | Quote
Joined: 27 May 2008
Canada
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Karma: 25
because it gets some variation, not just the same boring scale over and over, playing different modes lets you fly all over the place
Guitarslinger124  
23 Oct 2009 12:14 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
United States
Lessons: 12
Licks: 42
Karma: 38
Moderator
All the modes in one key have the same exact notes. The difference is the intervals. For example in C Ionian, you go from C to D to E which is two consecutive whole steps and that gives you a certain tonal quality. However, when playing B Locrian, you go from B to C to D which is a half step and a whole step; that gives you an entirely different tonal quality.

What scale you use all depends on how you want your solo to sound. If you traverse through more than one mode/scale during the course of one solo it changes your tonal quality because the intervals are very different than playing scale - which in turn will make it easier for the listener to hear what you are playing.

Change and differentials are what people hear. For example, you play a note and let it ring out for an indefinite period of time you would eventually not be able to recognize it. But if you play a different note your ear would pick up the tonal difference and change between the two notes. Try repeatedly saying the word "grass". Eventually the word will lose meaning and until you say a different word or make a new sound, your ear will no longer recognize the word.

Just something to think about.
nater2  
23 Oct 2009 13:05 | Quote
Joined: 28 May 2009
United States
Karma: 4
good advice. listen too them
guitarbadass  
23 Oct 2009 22:37 | Quote
Joined: 04 Oct 2009
United States
Karma: 1
yea but like i,ve keep sayin if every chord in the progression is a 16th yer not gonna be able 2 have the time 2 switch 2 a completly different mode 2 suit that chord,but nobody seems 2 get what i,m sayin,
RA  
24 Oct 2009 00:06 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
I made a vow not to post on power chord topics but i can't sleep so what the hell.

Guitarslinger124 says:
All the modes in one key have the same exact notes. The difference is the intervals. For example in C Ionian, you go from C to D to E which is two consecutive whole steps and that gives you a certain tonal quality. However, when playing B Locrian, you go from B to C to D which is a half step and a whole step; that gives you an entirely different tonal quality.



there is your answer. to understand modes you need to understand intervals. If your playing(soloing) diatonically in the key of C you won't start playing long F(the fourth) note over your C major triad(ooo triads scary) or you will sound like crap(exceptions..exceptions) due to it jarring with the E(the third) E to F = minor 2. tie in second place for most dissonant(in western 12 tone equal). But if you move to the the IV chord, the F major triad, in your I-IV-V the F would be a note you would dwell(general bad thing to do) due to it being the tonic.
but as seeing you using power chords anything goes as long as your in the diatonic major scale, because power chords don't really do anything there as neural and neutral can get.


I know this sounds like i am a arrogant, pompous, snob. but your post are getting redundant and you have two topics on the same thing, just ask for elaboration not just ignoring someone like they don't know what there saying. and read older posts this has been explained numerous times. and for the record i use power chords, chords with fifths in them, and i like to include the root, intervals should be used not abused you got 12 use them(and by use them i mean in a interesting way not just smash but it do love Leo Ornstein's "wild men's dance" not the biggest fan of Henry Cowell hhmmmm tone clusters)


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