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What type of scales are the best to learn to incorparate into general playing?

Technique
MuseFan  
18 Jan 2009 18:59 | Quote
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I wanted to know what scales i should first learn that would benefit my general playing the most.
telecrater  
18 Jan 2009 19:07 | Quote
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I would say start with C Major, no sharps of flats. You can progress from there.
guitarmastergod  
18 Jan 2009 20:15 | Quote
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i started out with e pentatonic scale, aparently its not a scale though. its the best to learn though cause its only 2 notes per string.
EMB5490  
18 Jan 2009 22:09 | Quote
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matters, what do you play, if you play blues and classic rock, learn pentatonics in and out first, if heavy metal, or classical learn the maj and minor scales, but for metal id know the pentatonic scale.
MuseFan  
19 Jan 2009 05:50 | Quote
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ok cool thanks for the advice guys
Doz  
19 Jan 2009 08:40 | Quote
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The minor pentatonic will be most useful for a beginner. Make sure you learn the major scale as well though.
RA  
19 Jan 2009 09:35 | Quote
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yah like Tele said start on learning the major scale(do so in the "CAGED" method), in C(being less complicated to the beginner{no shapes or flats}), and learn all of it's modes. while doing so you will by default learn the major/minor pentatonic(6add9/m7add11) by just learn each scales intervals. to help with hearing the modes the best method i have found is "the art of the uniguitar" which involves playing each of the modes on a single string up and down and all which ways(B string is the best for the beginner because c is on the first fret and you wont get confused by the "invisible fret"). start by playing relative modes(c Ionian,D Dorian, ect.) then to parallel modes (C Ionian, C Dorian, Ect.)


edit- after reading through the post again i see that crap about how pentatonic aren't a scale. that holds no weight what so ever be cause the theory behind it is that the pentatonic is a harmonic formula. while if that is the case neither is the major scale it's harmonic formula is MAJOR 13. just like the case with everything musical it is all based on where you standing at the given moment of playing. it is all true and false at the same time just like john cage says "the only things that don't have to mean anything is music and laughter"
JazzMaverick  
19 Jan 2009 15:32 | Quote
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When you're comfortable enough, you might want to look into the lessons I've posted, they should help you to understand the ways it how to work it into your playing. Also check out my Transcribing lesson. :)
MetaLHeaDDevil84  
19 Jan 2009 22:18 | Quote
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I personnally have a place in my heart for the Harmonic Minor scale. I dunno I think it has a little of a dark, creepy sound.
BodomBeachTerror  
19 Jan 2009 22:22 | Quote
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i like the harmonic minor too, but i definately wouldnt start with it.
MetaLHeaDDevil84  
19 Jan 2009 22:25 | Quote
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True
EMB5490  
19 Jan 2009 22:29 | Quote
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pentatonics the easyiest, major helps the most.
Afro_Raven  
20 Jan 2009 07:21 | Quote
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OK first thing you need to do is ignore RA's post (!), as although I'm sure he knows what he's talking about, that's WAY too much for you to be worrying about at this early stage.

Scales I would recommend are the major and minor scales (also try to learn the concept of relative major/relative minor scales, always useful - look on Google). Once you've done that, get onto the major and minor pentatonics in their root position ONLY.

When you think you've done all that (trust me that's quite a lot to be getting on with for now) check back here and we'll all be happy to suggest the next few steps for you.

Have fun,
Afro
RA  
20 Jan 2009 09:35 | Quote
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while i don't think so, i do admit without someone with you explaining it (if you are a complete beginner) it would/might be confusing.
les_paul  
20 Jan 2009 17:04 | Quote
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@Afro:

I caught something from what you said and just want to make sure I'm thinking right before I commit to my thought as a rule.

If you learn the major scale and all of it's modes then incorporate the relative minor you basically have the same scale. For example The relative minor for G major is E minor so they are basically the same scale they just have different root notes. If this is the case when you learn the major scale you have learned the minor scale as well. Is this right?
blackholesun  
20 Jan 2009 20:01 | Quote
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les_paul says:
when you learn the major scale you have learned the minor scale as well


You've learnt one of the minor scales, the natural minor, which is the Aeolian mode. There are also the harmonic and melodic minors, and the modes associated with them.
RA  
20 Jan 2009 20:05 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
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technically yes. but the relative scales in G Ionian are, A Dorian, B phrygian, C Lydian, D mixolydian, E Aeolian, and F# Locrain. the key to understanding the modes is in there intervals. while G Ionian and E Aeolian have the same notes (a,b,c,d,e,f#,g) they have different intervals Ionian - 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 Aeolian 1,2,b3,4,5,b6,b7 and the phasing of these notes change the tone.

on the side note Dorian,Phrygian, and Aeolian(generally inferred when saying minor) are all minor scales. while Ionian(inferred for major),Lydian(is actually the more major scale in tonality), Mixolydian are Major scales. and Locrian is a diminished scale. The Diatonic scales unlike pentatonic aren't just in strict major/minor tonality there more complicated then that.

edit- written while black was writing posted about the same time.
Afro_Raven  
21 Jan 2009 03:26 | Quote
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RA, could you explain to me how Lydian is 'more major' than Ionian? To my mind, you can't get more major than the major scale itself!

@les_paul: That's a fair point you're making, but you need to consider this from our friend MuseFan who started this thread. Let's say he learnt just D major in a box shape (which is the most likely way to learn a scale for the first time) and he's soloing around that. Now tell him to instantly switch to B minor in a box shape; that's going to cause a fair bit of confusion, it did for me when I was starting out. Just because D major is a closely related scale to B minor, it doesn't mean that you can see Bm all over the fretboard, because psychologically you're still thinking in D major. That's why you need to learn both separately.

Afro
RA  
21 Jan 2009 07:19 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
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can you scan something a page form a book and not get into trouble because i can explain it but i would rather show you. i got a book that would explain it better.

That and each box shape(simpler forms of/is a position) has all the modes in it and every note twice, meaning two octaves, and a perfect fourth. that being said there is no such thing as just a d major box shape and just a B minor box shape there both in the same box. (i might have misunderstood what you said or you where trying to keep it simple)
JazzMaverick  
21 Jan 2009 10:49 | Quote
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RA, what Fro is saying is that this is beyond MuseFan's ability right now, there's no point in mentioning modes because he's not ready to look into them. Apart from the Major scale and minor position.


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