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skool msuci thery

Music Theory
EMB5490  
9 Apr 2008 13:55 | Quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2008
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i prob should, but just in case, do u guys find anything rong with taking music thery at skool? im just asking in case, i dont wana take a full year course and find its not wut i thought... woops soz but the spelling
TheUndying  
9 Apr 2008 13:57 | Quote
Joined: 23 Mar 2008
United States
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College theroy classes are insanely hard but i think it'd be worth it...un less its a slow moving class that's below your current knowledge level
EMB5490  
9 Apr 2008 14:19 | Quote
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nope nothings below mine, i dont know shit bout music theroy. the beginning is kinda basics, key changes and stuff, then u get to write music, i figured it would help. i dont even know how to read base clef. which is what i play on trombone, been playing 4 5 years. still dont know how to read music. when i first get the piece, i dont know the tempo so i cant play, once we go through it a couple times i can play the leads part(mostly trumpets, by tht i mean the melody) without the music, then after i get tht i start to try to tune into my part. i have no clue how to read tht stuff, i play it by ear. is it still a good idea to go into the class?
blackholesun  
9 Apr 2008 14:20 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
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Definately. Go for it!
simon73  
9 Apr 2008 15:37 | Quote
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Any type of music theory is a help no matter how much or how little you know. Totally agree with black just go for it!
ThePusher  
9 Apr 2008 15:49 | Quote
Joined: 19 Jan 2008
Canada
Lessons: 3
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That's one of the most beneficial things to your ability's there is, I know that I'm going to McGirr (The Canadian equivalent of Berklee) to study music as a proffesion and that the couple of people my mom knows that went and studied theory and such have won Juno's (the Canadian equivalent of a Grammy) in conclusion it's the right choice.
KicknGuitar  
9 Apr 2008 20:05 | Quote
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
Lessons: 6
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If it's college you'll get schooled in something like so at the beginning,
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/lesson.php?id=27

It usually requires lots of memorization on your own, but it pays off so much. It is a class very much worth taking for a musician.
Guitarslinger124  
9 Apr 2008 21:12 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
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learning theory in school is a great way to go...but a warning- its very hard to find a decent theory class unless you spend a ton of money to go to a "music" school. i have found that most music classes are filled with bullshit teachers who stand solid in the opinion that if you cant sing you are not a musician. so, most of these classes will require site singing. the classes ive come across are structured around either vocals or piano. so me personally, im against the classes because i feel they should not be centered around any instrument. music is a language not specific to any instrument and therefore it is biased to teach your class music structured around a specific instrument.
however, like i mentioned above, there are schools just for music, in which you are more than likely to find a class that suits you and even a class that suits your specific instrumental needs. so if you can afford it, go for it!
EMB5490  
9 Apr 2008 21:36 | Quote
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we do do the class on the piano, but only when writing music. as i said b4, idk bout music theroy, so i wouldnt no y he would be on the piano. its a high skool class, taught by my band director, and i figure it couldnt hurt, so i think ill try it, anyways, i can always drop out if its boring or somthn like tht
league  
9 Apr 2008 22:25 | Quote
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Go for it. BTW how long does it take to learn how to read music. I tried teaching myself. I know how it works but I can only play extremely slow. Seems easier than tabs.
Guitarslinger124  
10 Apr 2008 00:49 | Quote
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reading music is easy...just a lot of memorization...but there are always little tricks to remember everything.
GRX40  
10 Apr 2008 20:53 | Quote
Joined: 20 Mar 2008
United States
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Guitarslinger124 says:
but there are always little tricks to remember everything

Yep, the spaces on the staff, from bottom to top, spell FACE.


-----------------
E
-------------------
C
-----------------
A
-----------------
F
-----------------


EDIT: It's hard to write out sheet music by typing!
les_paul  
10 Apr 2008 21:11 | Quote
Joined: 14 Feb 2008
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what I can't understand is there are more notes on the fret board than positions on the staff, but I guess Ignorance breeds confusion.
Doz  
10 Apr 2008 21:16 | Quote
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There aren't really. A staff can have different clefs for different ranges. Plus, you can use ledger lines to add to the current clef.
Guitarslinger124  
10 Apr 2008 22:35 | Quote
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les_paul says:
what I can't understand is there are more notes on the fret board than positions on the staff, but I guess Ignorance breeds confusion.


there are only 7 whole notes. and when writing music you only write whole notes...if you want a sharp or flat you simply add the symbol in front of the note or add it in the key signature.
les_paul  
10 Apr 2008 23:15 | Quote
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@guitarslinger

Have you studied music at a school or have you just pick things up on your own as you go along? Seems like you really know your stuff.
Guitarslinger124  
11 Apr 2008 14:01 | Quote
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I'm self taught all the way. I enjoy the challenge of teaching myself and I think it's more rewarding.
Notim  
11 Apr 2008 16:20 | Quote
Joined: 08 Dec 2007
United States
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I wish I had a chance when I was young to take theory classes I would have jumped on it so I say go for it.. ya GS me to but I never could do the reading of notes...just not logical to me....but listening to a sound and knowing where it is on the neck is ...
les_paul  
11 Apr 2008 17:05 | Quote
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I wish I had more of a musical ear, maybe it will get better over time.
EMB5490  
11 Apr 2008 17:48 | Quote
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i think ur born with a musical ear, im lucky, mine is fantastic. but i dod think it also can get better ovr time. btw i signed up 4 the coarse
GRX40  
11 Apr 2008 18:08 | Quote
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les_paul says:
what I can't understand is there are more notes on the fret board than positions on the staff, but I guess Ignorance breeds confusion.


Well, there are different positions. So if you wanted to play up at the 12th fret, it would say 12th position on the sheet music.
Notim  
11 Apr 2008 18:28 | Quote
Joined: 08 Dec 2007
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good deal EMB
KicknGuitar  
11 Apr 2008 18:41 | Quote
Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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Les, music notation on the staff is universal, so it leaves the positioning up to the player, what it specifically tells you is the exact pitch, or octave, hence the repetition of E on the treble clef.

EMB, Check this sit out. So much useful stuff pertaining to the basics of music theory.
http://musictheory.net/

You can download the whole site for future usage without the internet, and if you go to trainers lots of helpful apps to help you memorize notes on the staff, key signatures, etc.
Good luck, and enjoy it mate.
les_paul  
11 Apr 2008 19:00 | Quote
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GRX40 says:
Well, there are different positions. So if you wanted to play up at the 12th fret, it would say 12th position on the sheet music.


I have noticed this but never really put two and two together.

@EMB, I agree I think some people are born with a natural musical ear and ability, I brought this up once before. I also think some people are able to acquire this skill through practice.
EMB5490  
11 Apr 2008 19:03 | Quote
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cool site

yes the more music u listen to the better ur ear is. ive been listening to music since i was born, due to my dad.
Doz  
11 Apr 2008 22:33 | Quote
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Well, I think when people claim themselves or others to have a natural musical ear it's more like they were exposed to it as soon as and all through their lives really. This makes it come quicker to them since they recognise things better from all the years. I'm like that - my dad is a big music fan and I've been exposed to it since the start... and I've never had a problem trying to develop my ear... it just works.
les_paul  
11 Apr 2008 23:26 | Quote
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So your saying that it is possible for anyone to hone a well trained musical ear. It just comes easier for people who have been influenced by music from an early age.
EMB5490  
12 Apr 2008 08:06 | Quote
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ye i guess thts it. i was exposed to it since i was born. at like 2 i had classical music going on, on my tv(my dads concerts), and at like 3 or 4 i had the beatles. the ear is one of the first body parts to develop and work for a new born, so hearing and sound can effect som 1 gr8tly
league  
14 Apr 2008 18:00 | Quote
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Cool Kicknguitar. Your explanation about positioning and notes being universal clears my sheet music problem. I think I'll try to play "Mary had a Little Lamb" to get started.
Doz  
14 Apr 2008 18:06 | Quote
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Yeah, LP. It's easier for to pick up things the younger you are... consider the ways in which children pick up language. I guess the same applies to music... if you're around it when you're young you'll have a better feel for what works and what does't.


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