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Any advice on Jackson guitars?

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les_paul  
25 Feb 2008 18:45 | Quote
Joined: 14 Feb 2008
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I'm learning to play on an Epiphone LP standard I've been playing for about a month now. The other day I grabbed my buddies Strat and everything seemed to come so much easier on his guitar. I could move around alot faster and play with fewer mistakes. I don't know enough about guitars to understand why this is, but I am already looking into another guitar. I saw a Jackson at the guitar shop today. I didn't play it but it felt alot like the Strat. Any advice on this would be helpful.
Guitarslinger124  
25 Feb 2008 21:12 | Quote
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Well...playability has a lot to do with the neck of the guitar. LP's have thick chunky necks while strats have thick but flat necks. jackson's have thin flat necks and have pretty decent playability. it depends what you like....personally i dont like jackson necks at all. I dont like how flat they are. I prefer the thin "u" shaped necks of ESP, Washburn or Ibanez guitars.
brodyxhollow  
26 Feb 2008 09:20 | Quote
Joined: 04 Feb 2008
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Jackson Dinky's are amazing. I wouldn't say they're for everyone, everyone needs to find their own kind of axe, but I think it just depends on the Jackson in question. I don't like Strats much, but I took an instant attachment to my Jackson. I think a lot of it is honestly dependent on the size and shape of your fretting hand. I've got small hands, so the thin neck is a lot better for me. I don't like the maple fretboard of fender's too, I prefer playing on rosewood or ebony because the way my fingers strike the board and come off. It's dependent on solely what feels right to the player.
les_paul  
26 Feb 2008 11:21 | Quote
Joined: 14 Feb 2008
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what is the scale on a guitar? I have seen some guitars with a 25.5 scale and some with a 24.75 scale, what does this mean?
luckyhubbie  
26 Feb 2008 13:28 | Quote
United States
Posts: 69
Just wanted to say that I had the same trouble when I first started out. I played my Takemine for years and just never seemed to improve. Bar chords were impossible and buzzing was the norm. I finally took it to a guitar shop that was owned by a piano repairman. He put my acoustic on the rack and discovered the truss rod was never properly set up. after the fix it job the guitar played like a dream until it got hit by a gmc at 55mph. might just be the action is too high
Notim  
26 Feb 2008 16:17 | Quote
Joined: 08 Dec 2007
United States
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We'll all I got to say about Jackson is that if you have the money to buy it ...buy it!and thats all I have to say bout that...lol
brodyxhollow  
26 Feb 2008 16:19 | Quote
Joined: 04 Feb 2008
United States
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luckyhubbie says:
after the fix it job the guitar played like a dream until it got hit by a gmc at 55mph. might just be the action is too high


I'd definitely say the action is too high.
les_paul  
26 Feb 2008 16:27 | Quote
Joined: 14 Feb 2008
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les_paul says:
what is the scale on a guitar? I have seen some guitars with a 25.5 scale and some with a 24.75 scale, what does this mean?
I'm talking about the scale you see when you look at the specs for a guitar, not a musical scale. I just wanted to repost this so there is no confusion. On some guitars the scale is 24.75 and on others the scale is 25.5. What does this mean?
J.M.P.A.  
26 Feb 2008 17:21 | Quote
Joined: 12 Dec 2007
Karma: 1
That is from the web

Scale length
Scale length is the length of string between the bridge and the head nut—the part that vibrates
freely when plucked open.

25-1/2" is the scale length of most Fender guitars and was taken originally from the standard scale length for
steel-string acoustic guitars. This scale length provides high tension and thus a more trebly sound. Since it's
slightly more difficult to play guitars of this scale, it is common for guitarists to use lighter strings on
25-1/2"-scale instruments. The most famous guitars in this scale length are the Fender Telecaster and the
Fender Stratocaster. Both have been made continuously since the 1950s and have been copied widely. There are also
Squier versions of both. Other major manufacturers
of 25-1/2"-scale guitars include ESP, Ibanez,
Jackson, LTD, Parker, Schecter, and Steinberger, among others.




24-3/4" is the scale length of most Gibson guitars. Since it requires lower string tension, this scale length is
slightly easier to play and produces a less trebly sound. Typically, this scale of guitar is strung with slightly
heavier strings, which adds to the bass response and generates greater output from the pickups. The most famous
24-3/4"-scale guitars are the Gibson Les Paul, Gibson SG, Gibson Flying V, and the Gibson ES-335. Like the most-famous
Fender models, these have all been in continuous production since the '50s (with the exception of the Flying V) and
are available in more affordable versions from Epiphone.
Among other makers, Dean commonly uses the 24-3/4" scale.


Some makers use other scale lengths. PRS Guitars,
for example, uses a 25" scale length for a unique tone and slightly easier playing.


That is from the web you can read this on this web site
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/electric
league  
26 Feb 2008 22:34 | Quote
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Jacksons are good for thrash metal and jazz. Guitarslinger and I seem to think our guitars are better than each others. :) Same as you and that guy who has trouble playing chords on a strat.
brodyxhollow  
27 Feb 2008 10:17 | Quote
Joined: 04 Feb 2008
United States
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I dunno, I wouldn't say theyre only good for thrash and jazz. I think they're pretty adaptable guitars. I mean, yeah, maybe most well suited for those styles of music, but my dinky can tear up some rock and indie pretty good. Hell, it even sounds good with a little funk and reggae stuff.
league  
27 Feb 2008 17:10 | Quote
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Well almost any Metal guitar can handle rock.Heavy Metal and Blues guitars are the ones that are specially made. I would have to agree with you brodyxhollow. My Jackson Kelly plays fast but I can play almost any genre. Dinkys are probably the most adaptable Jacksons.It's pretty difficult to make a Jackson Kelly sound like a Fender Strat or Gibson Les Paul, but in the end it's still an electric guitar.
Guitarslinger124  
27 Feb 2008 20:56 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
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league says:
Guitarslinger and I seem to think our guitars are better than each others. :)


a jackson kelly was actually the first jackson i ever played...i liked it a lot! in fact, i almost bought it right there! i just prefer ESP over Jackson...plus i am aiming for and endorsement from ESP.
brodyxhollow  
28 Feb 2008 08:13 | Quote
Joined: 04 Feb 2008
United States
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I like Kelly's. I played them a couple times, and thought about getting one too, but I prefer to play with my Dinky :)


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