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rockabilly guitar

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sonic_vomit  
21 Sep 2007 18:31 | Quote
Posts: 5
does anyone know the best place to start when trying to take on rockabilly playing???
Guitarslinger124  
23 Sep 2007 20:21 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
United States
Lessons: 12
Licks: 42
Karma: 38
Moderator
learn all the blues you can! hehe....also try to get a feel for the rhythm which, i think, is the main theme in rockabilly stuff....you know its got that kinda bouncy sound to it...i sometimes play stuff like that when i jam with my friends just for fun...and sometimes all you gotta do is just nail a bitchin' rhythm....if you play progressions like this:
E:
B:
G:
D:
A:5--5--7--5--5--5--7-
E:3--3--3--3--3--3--3-
you'll get some pretty cool bouncy sounds...
blackholesun  
24 Sep 2007 13:01 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
Karma: 11
Moderator
A couple of years ago my guitar magazine featured guest lessons from Brian Setzer. I would scan in the tabs and create a midi of the lessons but I'm at university now and I'm not home until December, which is where my magazines are! Finger picking 7th chords in a I - IV - V progression works well.
Afro_Raven  
24 Sep 2007 13:22 | Quote
Joined: way back
United Kingdom
Lessons: 1
Karma: 20
Moderator
Hey blackholesun, this is completely the wrong thread for this but what uni are you at? Are you doing music? I'm trying to choose unis @ the mo cuz I wanna do popular/contemporary music. Just wanted to know if you were doing a music course; if so why you chose the course, the uni, what you think of it, etc.

Thanks

Afro
blackholesun  
24 Sep 2007 18:25 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
Karma: 11
Moderator
I'm in Exeter, but I'm doing Physics. They don't do music at the University of Exeter, but they do at Exeter College because I just looked on Ucas. Exeter seems like a really nice place so far, and Matt Bellamy's luthier is based in Manson Guitars in the high street.
sonic_vomit  
24 Sep 2007 23:28 | Quote
Posts: 5
Thanks for the advice guys i'll try that stuff out.sorry for the delay in my response ,i've been away.
sonic_vomit  
24 Sep 2007 23:41 | Quote
Posts: 5
@ blackholesun .I'm self taught and trying to teach myself some theory.
I don't really know(or understand)what 7th chords are.If I go to the guitar chord section is any chord with a 7 in the name what you meen??
if you have any time could you explain what makes a 7th chord a 7th chord.
Thanks.
Doz  
25 Sep 2007 07:27 | Quote
Joined: way back
United Kingdom
Karma: 10
Yeah, they do have a 7 in the name, but you get different types (eg dominant 7th, major 7th, minor 7th).

Sorry I can't be of much help, I'm off soon and just checking what's new (if no one has replied later I will do then).
blackholesun  
25 Sep 2007 09:40 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
Karma: 11
Moderator
If you're playing in C major then the I chord is Cmaj7, the IV chord is Fmaj7, and the V chord is G7. They are called 7th chords becuase they include the seventh scale degree in them. On the I and IV chords, the 7th scale degree is the natural 7th (called the major 7th), but on the V chord is it a flattened 7th (minor 7th).

A 7th chord with a major 3rd and a major 7th is a maj7 chord. With minor 3rds and 7ths it is a min7 chord, and with a major 3rd and a minor 7th it is a dominant 7th, which is just written as 7, eg G7. With a minor 3rd and a major 7th is called a min/maj7, but this is rarely found outside jazz as far as I know.

You could also use 9th chords, and other extensions. They work in the same way. Best thing to do is use the scale to chord tool, choose a scale, look to see what chords are the best to use (they are in bold), and go and learn some new shapes.
sonic_vomit  
25 Sep 2007 11:39 | Quote
Posts: 5
thanks for taking the time to explain all that.i'm starting to get it.
thanks again!


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