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scales

Music Theory
Tilikidis  
19 Aug 2007 18:42 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Karma
ok i just finished learning a few scales. full scales not just positions on the fretboard. now i was wondering how can i change the key of a scale without having to go back to the "drawing board" and re learn the entire scale.the scale im talking about is the e harmonic minor. i wanna learn the a harmonic minor but without doing what i stated above. is there a way i can count steps or something?
Doz  
19 Aug 2007 21:41 | Quote
Joined: way back
United Kingdom
Karma: 10
Well if you did learn different positions and patterns... you could just move them up so the root was on the right note for whatever key you want. Remember that everything repeats from the twelth fret (so the 13th fret is the same note and octave higher as the first fret).
mightydave  
20 Aug 2007 10:58 | Quote
Joined: way back
Belgium
Karma: 2
you can move everything down 5 steps or up 7 steps but like Doz said , you're better of learning the patterns and combining them to a full scale..
Afro_Raven  
31 Aug 2007 11:15 | Quote
Joined: way back
United Kingdom
Lessons: 1
Karma: 20
Moderator
Yep, unfortunately what Doz and Dave said is correct. The only other way to do it is to memorise all the notes on the fretboard, so that when you are using a scale in a different key, you can see which notes to hit. That is incredibly difficult and time consuming though, and the option that most of the pros (including Vai and Satriani) skip over. You are much better learning the scale positions and then moving them up or down the fretboard when you change key.

Afro
Tilikidis  
1 Sep 2007 02:52 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Karma
thanks for the input
grae  
11 Sep 2007 20:30 | Quote
Posts: 1
I would only add if you know where your tonic notes are on a fretbord then you could use the intervals to build a scale from there. In this case a E harmonic minor which is spelled 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, 7; you find your E's and you can build a scale from there as long as you know the major scale pattern (box).
Tilikidis  
13 Sep 2007 00:18 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Karma
ive actually been doing that with my riffs you know to change them up i didnt know what it was called though... thanks anyway
iqo_riffai  
30 Sep 2007 15:37 | Quote
France
Posts: 12
i knw lots of stuff bout music theory nd i knw how scales overlap (A minor nd C major 4 example) plus i knw all the notes on the fret board yet 2 me the easiest way 2 memorize a scale is the old way, via chord progressions,,A harmonic minor chord progs r:Am,Bdim,Caug,Dm,E,F,G#dim i memorise all my scales this way exept 4 pentatonic i use the box position i got used 2 it..


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