new transposer      circle of 5ths    wap


QuickProgsQuestion

Music Theory
supPuss  
24 Aug 2012 17:15 | Quote
Joined: 05 Jun 2012
Karma
when looking up types of progressions, are any of them scale-specific?

example, 50s progression I VI_min IV V

this can be developed from any given scale with at least 6 tones no?


thatguitarguy  
24 Aug 2012 17:40 | Quote
Joined: 24 Aug 2010
United States
Lessons: 1
Karma: 12
deriving chord progressions from different scales tends to change the type of chord and there fore changes how the progression looks (if the use upper case letters as numerals for major chords and lower case numerals for minor chords anyway)

like if you have a I IV V progression. you can almost bet that that is from the major scale but if it looks like this, i iv v, it is from some other scale (this one is from the natural minor scale.)

And then there are some that are written not so much from a theory stand point but more from how it sounds which is when you get things like I IV V iv V7.

hope this answers your question. if not disregard it.
supPuss  
24 Aug 2012 18:41 | Quote
Joined: 05 Jun 2012
Karma
yes this helps, cheers! :)

ps i just thought those steps u can find online i-III-whatever are like universal, cross-scale things...

thatguitarguy  
24 Aug 2012 20:28 | Quote
Joined: 24 Aug 2010
United States
Lessons: 1
Karma: 12
what scales do you want to use?
supPuss  
25 Aug 2012 18:40 | Quote
Joined: 05 Jun 2012
Karma
hey gtrguy i was just inquiring really, i found several of those progression layouts online and looking into them i was just curious...

i think ill just run them through the chords-2-scale tool, see which scales come up. most of them use 3tone chords so i guess there should be some really clean matches there...

when playing guitar i mostly just improvise/play around with the chords i can use, although i have to admit since i started looking into harmonic rules [on this site mostly] while playing sometimes ill pick the next chord based on what i've seen in theory...

so yea to answer your question [lol sorry for the novel here] this theory i find most useful when im looking into what types of movement you can have... especially eh... modulating stuff, i've found this site's scale-2-chords tool very helpful in trying for that "modulating" kind of feeling to a sequence [here's some examples of things where i tried that, tho not too sure about the results http://soundcloud.com/omanogodomanogod/sets/studies/ ]

do you find that better you are playing-wise, more theoretical ideas creep in while playing? ...this seems to be the case for me
thatguitarguy  
25 Aug 2012 18:57 | Quote
Joined: 24 Aug 2010
United States
Lessons: 1
Karma: 12
I dont think it really shows more the better you know the theory. I only use theory when Im getting bored of the sameness of the things that pop out of my head. Im sure that if I got more practice applying the theory knowledge I have it would show more.

so yeah I guess what Im saying is learn theory but also practice applying it and you will see it become more natural to you (I think Im going to start doing this too). Then you can break the theory rules more effectively to make it sound more interesting.
supPuss  
25 Aug 2012 19:26 | Quote
Joined: 05 Jun 2012
Karma
[I dont think it really shows more the better you know the theory. I only use theory when Im getting bored of the sameness of the things that pop out of my head]

haha yea i guess you're right!

it def does in my case tho but it probably is just cuz i was looking at it alot lately [i should have mentioned tho im curious to how music works, just in general]


Copyright © 2004-2017 All-Guitar-Chords.com. All rights reserved.