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Capo Tuning

Music Theory
MrChills  
8 Feb 2012 00:54 | Quote
Joined: 08 Feb 2012
Karma
I write a lot of music using a capo, using very non-standard chords. And, when trying to add other instruments to recording (bass, keyboard), I sometimes struggle to find the matching chord on the corresponding instrument.

Does anyone know of an application out there that allows you to place a Capo and pick out the fingering to distinguish the chord?

Many thanks!
btimm  
8 Feb 2012 05:47 | Quote
Joined: 14 Dec 2009
United States
Lessons: 2
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All a capo does it change the tuning of the guitar by incrementally increasing the key with each fret. So if you know the chord in the open position, you would know the chord with the capo by simply adjusting the key. For example, we know the E major chord in the open position is 022100. If you played the same chord with a capo on the 5th fret, then, you would increase the chord by 5 half steps.

So E --> F --> F# --> G --> G# --> A

The E fingering in the open position, when played with a capo on the 5th fret, would now be an A major chord.

I hope this makes sense, you don't really need any special tool, just determine what the chord is in the open position and adjust. You could then use the chord name tool on this website!

Of course, you could also just determine what notes are in the chord you are playing itself and then determine the chord, which might be better for learning purposes. You would then know that the E fingering with a capo on the 5th fret would consist of these notes running down the strings: A, E, A, C#, E, A - which are the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes in the A major scale, making it an A major chord.
Guitarslinger124  
8 Feb 2012 07:40 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
United States
Lessons: 12
Licks: 42
Karma: 38
Moderator
btimm says:
All a capo does it change the tuning of the guitar by incrementally increasing the key with each fret. So if you know the chord in the open position, you would know the chord with the capo by simply adjusting the key. For example, we know the E major chord in the open position is 022100. If you played the same chord with a capo on the 5th fret, then, you would increase the chord by 5 half steps.

So E --> F --> F# --> G --> G# --> A

The E fingering in the open position, when played with a capo on the 5th fret, would now be an A major chord.

I hope this makes sense, you don't really need any special tool, just determine what the chord is in the open position and adjust. You could then use the chord name tool on this website!

Of course, you could also just determine what notes are in the chord you are playing itself and then determine the chord, which might be better for learning purposes. You would then know that the E fingering with a capo on the 5th fret would consist of these notes running down the strings: A, E, A, C#, E, A - which are the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes in the A major scale, making it an A major chord.



+1
RA  
8 Feb 2012 08:13 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
btimm says:
Of course, you could also just determine what notes are in the chord you are playing itself and then determine the chord, which might be better for learning purposes. You would then know that the E fingering with a capo on the 5th fret would consist of these notes running down the strings: A, E, A, C#, E, A - which are the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes in the A major scale, making it an A major chord.


I don't mean to be rude to you MrChills but that is your answer. Not being able to play other parts on top of others (provide it's needed) due to modal, harmonic, or rhythmic means shows a lack of foundation. Chords are not random dots found on the fretboard they are developed based on mathematical relationships. I'm not saying you need to know how your 3:2, 5:4, and 6:5 relate, but knowing what notes your playing and how the intervals relate and stack onto one another is a must. If that is known your "question" is solved. Again this shouldn't be seen as an attack just tough love something we need more of these days.
MrChills  
8 Feb 2012 22:41 | Quote
Joined: 08 Feb 2012
Karma
Thanks for the feedback - I understand how a capo affects tuning, the issue I guess is more of even knowing what chords I am forming without the capo. I am forming a lot of very non-standard chords, that even without the capo I wouldn't be able to say what they are. So, how would I determine a chord from the notes I have covered?
BodomBeachTerror  
9 Feb 2012 01:42 | Quote
Joined: 27 May 2008
Canada
Lessons: 2
Licks: 1
Karma: 25
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_name.php

♫badadadaaa♫
MrChills  
9 Feb 2012 03:23 | Quote
Joined: 08 Feb 2012
Karma
^ I tried that app, and many others and no dice. Half of what I put in doesn't return a chord.. Oh, well.. I will figure out in the end, I was just looking for a short cut, abd I'll take it as a compliment that I am composing something unique.. Thanks for the help.


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