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Chord progression from scales

Music Theory
Empirism  
28 Jan 2012 13:26 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
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Well... Emp here again asking stupid questions...

When I have full scale front of me say in guitar scale tool. Is there any tricks to choose chord progression from that scale based on basic music theory that fits to the scale perfectly?
gshredder2112  
28 Jan 2012 23:30 | Quote
Joined: 03 Sep 2010
United States
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yessir

cmaj scale (r)
C,d,e,f,g,a,b 1-3-5
c e G cmaj chord

mode 2 D dorian Dmin

D,e,f,g,a,b,c 1-3-5-
D f a

Keep going in that order with modes. E phyrigian,F ldyian,G mixoldyian
A min,And b locrian.

A mode is a Scale built from any other scale containing the same notes in a differnet order.

If we compare


C,d,e,f,g,a,b, Major to c,e,g cmaj
d,e,f,g,a,b,c dorian to d,f,a dmin
e,f,g,a,b,c,d, phyrigian e,g,b emin
f g,a,b,c,d,e ldyian f,a,c, fmaj
g,a,b,c,d,e,f mixoldian g,b,d gmaj
a,b,c,d,e,f,g, minor(natural)a,c,e amin
b,c,d,e,f,g,a locrian b,d,f bdim
Now if we take those scale and use the root note,3rd, and 5th from each of those respective scales we get our chords. refer to above

these formulas basically relate to any scale you may come across.

\m/(*-t)
gs2112

gshredder2112  
28 Jan 2012 23:30 | Quote
Joined: 03 Sep 2010
United States
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Also note,those formulas can be used fo more advanced chords assuming you know the correct formula.
Guitarslinger124  
29 Jan 2012 02:50 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
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Moderator
Check out these two lessons:

Empirism  
29 Jan 2012 03:29 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
Karma: 35
Good, thanks m8s, that confirmed what I thought. So... the triads or the "reference?" are they always same, maj, min, min, maj, maj, dim. If not, from where they are formed.

great lessons gs, I read them few times already, but it seems that every once in a while if you read those theory lessons you get something new again lol, i liked this:

"Like I said above, there is never a finite solution to the eternal question of "What do I play with this?". And if you take a look at the chart, you can clearly see that if you were to play a Maj7 chord, you chould play either the Ionian, or Lyidian scales. Or if you were to play a minor chord, you would be free to use the Dorian, Phrygian or Aeolian scales." yeah, cant be more clear :P

also when building a chord progression, I know its kinda limitless no matter if you use I IV V I or any other, but still like some other combinations just dont "sound" right atleast for me, but they are "right" in theory?
Guitarslinger124  
29 Jan 2012 04:35 | Quote
Joined: 25 Jul 2007
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Moderator
Empirism says:
also when building a chord progression, I know its kinda limitless no matter if you use I IV V I or any other, but still like some other combinations just dont "sound" right atleast for me, but they are "right" in theory?


That is always possible. It's what is called dissonant; found mostly in Jazz music. I talk a little about it in my lesson: Music Theory: A Look Down the Path of... .

Of course everyone has different tastes in music, so theoretically correct or not, you might think something sounds "good" while someone else thinks otherwise.

Rock on!

btimm  
29 Jan 2012 14:11 | Quote
Joined: 14 Dec 2009
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Yeah, gs124 hit the nail on the head there man. One of the greatest things about music is that you can learn and apply all the theory in the world ... and then throw it out. If you like the sound of it, then it can't be "wrong". :o) Theory is a great building block for musical knowledge and success but the ultimate judge is the ear, not the theory.
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