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Improve Picking and Accenting

Lessons
EMB5490  
4 Jan 2012 16:27 | Quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2008
United States
Lessons: 1
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Karma: 31
This isnt a complicated lesson really.

Lets take the modes (if you dont know the modes there should be a lesson on the site for them)

Anyway take any mode or all if you want to work them all.

Try accenting different beats. It sounds easy, but its not. This means to hit one note harder or more accented then the rest. If you want to challenge yourself and honestly the best way to do this is to play softly besides the accented note, and on the accented note you... accent it :)

Note: ALWAYs use alternate picking for this excersize, and ALWAYS use a metronome for this excersize. Pereferably one that accents the one (you know like its louder on the 1 or a different sound, so you can differentiate your 1 of the beat and dont get lost)

I start the metronome at 60 bpm and do 16th notes. 4 Notes per beat. So its "1-y-and-uh" Go up and down a major scale (ionian) or any other scale mode


1. Accent the 1 or the beat. (Accent the click, this should be natural and easy)

2. Accent the 2 of the beat or the "y"

3. Accent the 3 of the beat or the "and"

4. Accent the 4 of the beat or the "uh"


This is very useful for making simple common licks sounds awesome and interesting, and making awesome and interesting licks sound evern more awesome and interesting. YEAAA

If your master of all excersizes and really want to challenge yourself... Put the metronome so it only ticks on the 2 and the 4. A common practice method. This would mean that the 1 and the 3 on the metronome dont tick. This is much harder.
gshredder2112  
4 Jan 2012 19:52 | Quote
Joined: 03 Sep 2010
United States
Licks: 3
Karma: 22
Great lesson,and nicely explained.

I do have one comment about #4, Reggae guitarist
often only play and accent on the 2 and 4 beats in a song
so essentially,its a good exercise for reggae (:

+2 +4
\M/(*-+)
gs2112
nullnaught  
4 Jan 2012 22:18 | Quote
Joined: 05 Jun 2010
Karma: 22
Where did you get the 1, y and uh from? Good lesson.
btimm  
4 Jan 2012 22:40 | Quote
Joined: 14 Dec 2009
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I am not sure about the "y", I have always been tough the second part of the beat is "e". nullnaught, I think this is common terminology for breaking down the parts of a beat.
nullnaught  
5 Jan 2012 02:25 | Quote
Joined: 05 Jun 2010
Karma: 22
ive always thought of a 4 beat pattern as 1, 2, 3 and 4.
btimm  
5 Jan 2012 05:14 | Quote
Joined: 14 Dec 2009
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Lessons: 2
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Karma: 16
Not 4 beats - 4 parts of a beat.

1-e-and-uh, 2-e-and-uh, 3-e-and-uh, 4-e-and-uh would be 4 beats, each with 4 sixteenth notes.
EMB5490  
5 Jan 2012 06:40 | Quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2008
United States
Lessons: 1
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Karma: 31
People learn it different ways i guess but i was teaching subdividing once and wrote "1-e-and-uh" and he was like "1-eh-and uh" so i just switched to y. But the way you probably learned it was 1-e-and-uh. Its basically the common method for subdividing a beat into 4 beats, or 4 16ths notes
nullnaught  
5 Jan 2012 17:14 | Quote
Joined: 05 Jun 2010
Karma: 22
i meant 4 individual sounds. isnt that right?
tinyskateboard  
5 Jan 2012 17:33 | Quote
Joined: 28 Apr 2010
United States
Karma: 11
btimm says:
I am not sure about the "y",


That's pronounced "E" in Spanish as in 'Cerveza y tequila por favor'.
case211  
5 Jan 2012 18:52 | Quote
Joined: 26 Feb 2009
United States
Lessons: 2
Licks: 6
Karma: 24
DOH! XD I was totally gonna make a spanish joke about the y too... Should have just clicked 'post' when I had it typed haha


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