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"blue note?" or "chromatic?"

Music Theory
gx1327  
21 Sep 2011 17:16 | Quote
Joined: 20 Sep 2009
United States
Karma: 9
just saw electric six in concert (for the THIRD time and it was awesome) and decided i had to learn the riff from "**** bar". you can look up the song/riff if you are interested (i presume you are all big boys who know how to use the internet), but i'm curious about what this is:



3 5
D|| F | | G
A|| C | C#| D
E|| | | A


would that C# be a chromatic? or is it a blue note? i'm not sure if this is a blues scale, or just a pentatonic scale with a chromatic thrown in.

on that note, does the "blue note" have to be a flatted 5b (as in the blues minor scale) or is it considered any chromatic note thrown in between two notes?

either way it's a $1,000,000 riff and a lot of fun to play. okay these guys probably haven't made $1,000,000 yet but they certainly deserve to! and they tour like madmen i recommend seeing them if you can.
case211  
21 Sep 2011 18:23 | Quote
Joined: 26 Feb 2009
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the "blue note" is merely a nickname for that chromatic that is the b5 added to a pentatonic scale. Makes it sound bluesier hence "blue note".
gshredder2112  
21 Sep 2011 19:02 | Quote
Joined: 03 Sep 2010
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@case +1
GuitarGeorge  
22 Sep 2011 10:07 | Quote
Joined: 17 Jul 2009
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Usually when people talk about a 'blue note', they mean one of the following two:
-The flat fifth.
-The blue third - a note in between the minor and the major third (bend the minor third slightly...).

The C# is a major seventh in a D scale, and not typically referred to as a blue note. But I guess you can call it that, if it sounds 'blue' to you. :)

Cool riff by the way!
gx1327  
22 Sep 2011 17:09 | Quote
Joined: 20 Sep 2009
United States
Karma: 9
well i think what i was meaning to ask was --- this does not appear to be a common "blues" scale. if it were G Blues Minor (which would include C, C#, and D), then it would not include the A, it would be A#.

unless this is a different mode of the Blues Minor but i don't think it is, because that 4-5b-5 is unique and C-C#-D only exists in the Blues Minor.

so in other words, the C# is simply a chromatic thrown in. one of those musical things that doesn't follow a pattern exactly but still sounds good. god i find them everywhere...
case211  
22 Sep 2011 17:33 | Quote
Joined: 26 Feb 2009
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Hence the beauty of music man

But the b5 is going to be considered your "blue note" in whatever key you are in, not necessarily pertaining to any particular note, just in the position that note is in given the current key.


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