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scales

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epsol  
20 Dec 2005 21:20 | Quote
Posts: 4
hi! I'm trying to understand how to use the scales. I already know the pentatonic major and the major scale but i dont know when to use it. For instace I have a song that starts in A chord, what do I need to use the pentatonic major or the major scale? please help.
dadio_detroit_blues  
21 Dec 2005 09:26 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
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Either one will work! That is the beauty of music theory.


The real question is what is the next chord? The next chord can help determine what scale would work better.

If your song is writen in A major then you can use the A major pentatonic scale all day and it will always fit. However, if want to add a little flavor to your music zip a lick using the A mojor scale and make sure you use the 4th and the 7th and end up with a note that would carry you into your next chord.

I hope this helps.
epsol  
21 Dec 2005 12:05 | Quote
Posts: 4
thanks for that! well the next chard is G, so it goes like A, G, F. you said that the next chord help how. please help me thanks.
dadio_detroit_blues  
21 Dec 2005 15:26 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Karma
epsol,

In your chord progresion you are actually changing keys when you play F. I would try playing A major scale over the A chord, A major pentatonic over the G chord with a lead in note either (F# or E) to go into the F chord. Keep in mind when you play the F chord that you have changed key so the A pentatonic will not work over that chord. You will have to learn a F major scale or F pentatonic for that chord. Or you could change the F chord to a F#m and then you could play the A pentatonic for the whole three chords.

Good luck!
epsol  
22 Dec 2005 01:34 | Quote
Posts: 4
I'm sorry if i'm slow, but do you mean ,in every change in chord i will change the scale too?
dadio_detroit_blues  
22 Dec 2005 08:12 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Karma
epsol,

I am just learning too. I remember a year ago I walked into a guitar store looking at guitars. I only knew two blues riffs and I was playing several types of guitars to determine what I should buy. A guy walks into the room who was a concert guitarist (clasical) and I was amazed by his style. I apolized for my bad playing. He said we are all musicians at heart. We are all at different levels. He said goahead and play and keep learning. That is why I like this forum we are all in the quest to keep learning. You don't have to applogize...just keep learning.

In your song that you are writing you have several options. If you are just starting out in music theory I would suggest the first option.

1) I would suggest you alter your chord progression just a little so that you are always playing in the Key of A major. On this sight you can find chords and fingerings in this keyunder the tab (chord progressions). Just to give you a head start, if you play any of the following chords (A, Bm, Cm, D, E, Fm, Gdim) you can always use the A major Pentatonic scale. To give your music alitte more flare you may try the A major scale over the A chord.

2) If you need the sound and the feeling of the music as you have written it, A,G, and F, then you will need to change scales for every Chord you play. A major or A pentatonic scale for the A chord, G major or G pentatonic for the G chord, and the F major or F pentatonic scale over the F scale.

Since its your song, you need to decide which way is better for the mood and the sound for your music. For the sake of the listener you will need to choose one of the options so the scales (notes) fit with your scales.

I hope this helps.

PS: I made an error in my last statement. The G is not in the Key of A. Sorry for the confussion.
unclewarwar  
22 Jan 2006 05:51 | Quote
Posts: 5
This might be too basic, but if you are playing a major I-IV-V chord progression you can use the minor sixth scale... for instance G-C-D play the E minor pentatonic scale. My acoustic band mate and I use this formula 80% of the time. He lays down the I-IV-V rythm and I will "noodle" around in the VI minor pentatonic scale and it always sounds good.
gtrguru  
5 Mar 2006 18:15 | Quote
Posts: 15
epsol,

Your post is several weeks old now regarding your A G F progression, but for what it's worth I'll comment anyway. Try using the A minor pentatonic over the whole thing. It should sound great! You might think that the A minor pentatonic would clash with the A chord (and I'll admit it does), but in context with the rest of the progression, it should sound great, if not 'bluesy'!


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