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static chord progressions.

Technique
gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 15:04 | Quote
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does any anybody know any rules over playing over over static chord progressions using chords?
AlexB  
19 Apr 2011 15:58 | Quote
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?? What is a static chord progression?
Guitarslinger124  
19 Apr 2011 15:58 | Quote
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Ditto Alex.
gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 16:06 | Quote
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a static chord progression is a harmony that is made up of the prolongation of one chord rather than a series of progressions.
Guitarslinger124  
19 Apr 2011 16:13 | Quote
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That wouldn't be a progression. A "musical progression" implies, or requires, rather, a succession of tones or chords as in, more than one. Progression in a general sense is a process or a continuous series.

To call something a "static progression" is in itself, an oxymoron.

However, let's say for a moment, that such a thing did exist outside the realm of theoretical essays, the same "rules" would apply as with any "normal" progression. Play the "right notes" in whatever key fits best.

Rock on!
gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 16:56 | Quote
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http://www.freeguitarvideos.com/LJ3/static-chord-licks.html

guitarslinger^^^ take alook at that link.static chord progressions are very popular in jazz.you are correct when you call a.static chord progression oxymoron,but hey alot of music theory terms dont make sense .I was just doin some research on jazz guitar techniques,and i came acriss this.it looked cool i was wonderin if you guys had any tips on it.
AlexB  
19 Apr 2011 17:48 | Quote
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"Though the chord progression itself doesn't change, we can imply changes by using different scales"

Its not a progression! anyways,if you want to use different scales over the same chord,learn your scales and learn your chords,then use the propper scale to the propper chord,this is called playing over changes in jazz,not "static chord progressions"

If you want to play different chords over the same rot note,learn joe Satriani's Pitch Axis theory

gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 18:12 | Quote
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hey,hey chill man i didnt create it.i just called it what is was called.when.i read it.also a static chord progreasion is just a fancy way of saying vamp i just realized.
example.how what scale/chords would i play over.a c7vamp(ie. a static chord progression.)
RA  
19 Apr 2011 18:48 | Quote
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I'm confused what are you asking about as the link doesn't say much.

Pedal points (or in your cases pedal chord [sure there's a better name])

examples:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDQpZT3GhDg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7in-9E3ImQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R416VHIL514 (example of point [bass is an Eb])

Modal Jazz

Examples:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlIU-2N7WY4&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMiysBB-4wM (I figure you'll like Pat)

Then there are static bits to songs like the B part to T-monk's "Monk's Dream"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYIq_pQ8mmk


Your just being too vague for me (I'm assuming you don't really know what you want right? [the reason for the examples]). They all have different techniques and different songs want different things. The whole "implying" bit sound like pedal point to me as depending on how your viewing it you can go in a lot of directions.

the link you posted sounds more like a training exercise to me though.

best thing to do (especially with jazz) is just listen to them and hear what their doing. it is really the only way

Vamp mean ostinato or riff
Guitarslinger124  
19 Apr 2011 18:50 | Quote
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He calls it a "Static Chord", with "Static" being the key word and "chord" being the subject; as in singular. Again, like I said before, not a progression. I.e., a chord that "doesn't move" or a chord that is, for all intents and purposes, static.

Second point, I am of the opinion that pretty much everything in music makes perfect sense, names included. Case in point, and I don't mean to sound mean, but you should make sure you understand exactly what it is you want help with or want to share, in order to avoid the above confusion.

Either way, my suggested tip stays the same. Play as you would normally, but keep in mind, since there is no changing in the chord harmony, you may make up for that by overlaying it with a more melodic approach.


Rock on!
RA  
19 Apr 2011 18:59 | Quote
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Idk, I mean sure is it literally a "progression", of course not. but is calling it a progression all that sinful. For example, "Hey Tom whats the progression to the second Part," "Just a C7, play it funky".

And if you know your poly-chords, it opens a lot of comping ideas and you can through out some weird ass triads. Damn I love Monk best American composer hands down.
Guitarslinger124  
19 Apr 2011 19:07 | Quote
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RA says:
And if you know your poly-chords, it opens a lot of comping ideas and you can through out some weird ass triads.


True story. However, even if you don't know what sounds good over what, biharmonies/chords are usually fun to *** around with anyhow.

I am definitely a fan of "the wall of sound" approach, and that fits right into the mold.

Rock on!
gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 19:09 | Quote
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hey,um sorry guys i guess i.should do more research on something before i ask about it.But isnt that the point of me asking.about it?not tryn to be an ass but,if you didnt know anything about it why did you comment on it. google static chord progression and see what pops up.its the info/links i gave you guys.maybe i was mislead about what it actually is,but thats why i asked
RA  
19 Apr 2011 19:23 | Quote
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I'm not saying not to ask questions ask away but you have to see it from my perspective. I know what static Harmony is I gave you examples but a little work on you part it need.

maybe a comparison is someone making a post saying, "hey those scale things tell me about them."

my response is, "what do you want to know the topic is huge."

and I just want to know about them is not an answer. Again think if someone asked you< "scales tell me them NOW"

and I'm sorry but don't pat yourself on the back for the link you gave it is vague at best.


another example

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewwe89dtEyE

another like thing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewwe89dtEyE

even though this written as two chords it can be viewed as functioning as one. though I wouldn't call it static harmony but hopefully you get my point

Guitarslinger124  
19 Apr 2011 19:35 | Quote
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gshredder2112 says:
hey,um sorry guys i guess i.should do more research on something before i ask about it.But isnt that the point of me asking.about it?


Hey man, sorry if I came on harsh. Not my intention at all. I am pulling staff duty (24 hour shift) and it is 0211, so I'm a wee bit tired.

Anyhow, a static chord can be any chord you like and said chord does not have to remain static. It is really not a useful term. But pretending it is, RA's mentioning of polychords is brilliant. To keep it simple, polychords are essentially, two different chords played on top of each other.

So, play your staic chord, say... Am.



Am
e:-5-|
B:-5-|
G:-5-|
D:-7-|
A:-7-|
E:-5-|


And you could play any number of triads/arppeggios over it, i.e.:


Guitar 1:
Am
e:-|5--5--|
B:-|5--5--|
G:-|5--5--|
D:-|7--7--|
A:-|7--7--|
E:-|5--5--|

Guitar 2: (Thinking in jazz, like you suggested)
Em7b5 Fmaj7
e:-|----------12--------|
B:-|--------13--10------|
G:-|------12------10----|
D:-|----12----------10--|
A:-|--10--------------0-|
E:-|10-----------------0|


So, while your Am is remaing static, what you now have are polychords. Ofcourse you don't need to play them as arppeggios and as true polychords, they wouldn't be arppeggios...

Ofcourse you can turn those arppeggios into shred licks... Or leaving them and layer a solo over top.

Rock on!
gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 19:38 | Quote
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i never claimed that link was any good.my original question did you read it?it clearly ask,what scales/chords to play over a static chord progression.

for example 8 bars of a C7 .chord being played.is there a particular way to.comp.over a single chord,maybe play over it using chords.derived from.the cmaj scale? or the cmaj.scale itself.

do you see what im getting at.now?
Guitarslinger124  
19 Apr 2011 19:40 | Quote
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Check it dude, Guitarslinger's lesson, These Ain't For No Weight

Maybe that'll help.

[bRock on!
gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 19:40 | Quote
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@gs its all good man,and thats part if the answer i was looking.for,thanks.
RA  
19 Apr 2011 19:46 | Quote
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yeah poly-chords like I said.

iii over I becomes a Major 7
bIII over I becomes a Minor 7
V over I becomes a Major 9

this is under the umbrella of Pedal Point (look that up very important) You just static a Tone (or in you case Chord) and play trids over it. It's a very large topic.

or for your Vamp suggestion, instead of playing the chord play an arpeggio and then play the triads.

The point is the triads add up to a much larger harmony.

gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 19:52 | Quote
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haha thank you both! Sorry i wasnt clearer b4.but you guys are smart enough to give this idiot the.answers he was lookn for thank you.
Guitarslinger124  
19 Apr 2011 19:54 | Quote
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Glad we could help.


Rock on!
gshredder2112  
19 Apr 2011 19:57 | Quote
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i tried playing dminor and aminor over cmaj and.it sounded great!
jlawrence31  
7 Jul 2011 19:00 | Quote
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Let's assume an E7 static progression (implies some changes of voicings and other movement, but still an E7). I might solo over it using Em pent/blues; then switch to E Mixolydian (A major); and then go to B melodic minor scale.
tinyskateboard  
8 Jul 2011 00:47 | Quote
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gshredder2112 says:
if you didnt know anything about it why did you comment on it.
YOU can't possibly have really written that! I am rolling upon the floor at the same time that I'm also laughing. (I wish there was a shorter way to write that sentiment, some form of shorthand maybe.)
tinyskateboard  
8 Jul 2011 00:54 | Quote
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GS2112: interesting question...I like it. It's got me thinking.
gshredder2112  
8 Jul 2011 01:13 | Quote
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I do not know whether to feel complimented or insulted.
I ll go with complimented,cause its instant gratification.

\M/(*-+)
gs2112

p.s. Shorter sentiment.: Got factS,or get backs XD
thatguitarguy  
8 Jul 2011 09:53 | Quote
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you could play some cool triad pieces over them to make them sound more solid.

there are some examples in this link.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6n3IP-PRa6M
tinyskateboard  
8 Jul 2011 11:02 | Quote
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GS2112: it was my longhand (stretched out sentiment) for ROFL :)
gshredder2112  
8 Jul 2011 11:05 | Quote
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I thought you wanted a shorter
sentiment for my question^^ up there
guess i misread it,oh well.

\M/(*-+)
gs2112


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