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soy.el.che  
6 Mar 2007 15:49 | Quote
Joined: way back
Mexico
Lessons: 1
Karma: 9
hello hellloooo come back to the place were you have gone
hi. im at the age that some guitar players realize that theyve lost much time while playing tabs and not learning theory: can anyone explain me anything that has to do with this symbols, and how theyre used in different stiles of music ( vii, vi, iv, I, etc.)
and by the way, anything that caused you trouble when learning it, or anything you have had trouble with it, it will be handful or usefull or watever you say it
thanks a lot beforehand
iqo_riffai  
7 Oct 2007 14:13 | Quote
France
Posts: 12
i learned theory very well but am a really bad teacher but ill explain those symbols 2 u...

a roman numeral usually means a chord...
wen its capital i.e I this means its major
wen its small i.e i means its minor
a small number with a "*" i.e i* means diminished

now 4 the number itself it indicates the order of chords,,,for example lets take a very common chord progression:I-IV-V in the key of E, that wud be E-A-B...
nd so on 4 every chord progression...

any theory questions am here 2 help nd i hope this is useful 4 ya..
iqo..
Davo  
12 Oct 2007 09:17 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Karma
These are basically the scale degrees. If you've ever heard reference to the "3rd" "5th" etc of a chord, that is what the degrees are.

The roman numerals represent a formula that can be applied to a scale to easily derive the chords that go with that scale. For example... if you take the C major scale:

C D E F G A B

Now if you apply the formula (with the descriptions iqo provided)

I ii iii IV V vi VII

you get the chords of the C major Key as follows:

C Dmin Emin F G Amin B (the VII chord is actualy a diminished chord, but don't worry about that at first)

If you apply the same formula to the A major scale you can see how the formula applies to all scales the same:

(I have to show this vertically or the forum screws up the spacing)

A -- I --- Amajor
B -- ii -- Bmin
C# - iii - C#min
D -- IV -- Dmajor
E -- V --- Emajor
F# - vi -- F#min
G# - VII - G#major

So when you see people say a song uses a 1, 4, 5 progression, what they mean is a I, IV, V progression... the 1st, 4th and 5th degrees of the scale... or (for A major) the chords A, D and E.

Hope that helps.
Afro_Raven  
12 Oct 2007 12:36 | Quote
Joined: way back
United Kingdom
Lessons: 1
Karma: 20
Moderator
Davo says:
G# - VII - G#major


Chord VII in A is G#dim - but I think you knew that anyway

Afro
Davo  
12 Oct 2007 14:05 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Karma
Yes... I did mention that the VII chord is diminished... but it's often played as a major chord or a 7th chord in rock, so I figured he could worry about dim chords when he's a little further along and takes in some theory:)
blackholesun  
13 Oct 2007 09:21 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
Karma: 11
Moderator
it's a major chord when the mixolydian mode is used.
sonicreducer  
30 Oct 2007 01:39 | Quote
United States
Posts: 15
can someone help me real quick
sonicreducer  
30 Oct 2007 01:58 | Quote
United States
Posts: 15
can someone help me real quick
bodom  
30 Oct 2007 06:27 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Lessons: 4
Karma: 5
help with what?
tAUG  
2 Nov 2007 10:28 | Quote
Sweden
Posts: 137
sonicreducer says:
can someone help me real quick

Why don't you create a new thread and wright the question there?

tAUG


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