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Pleease help me!

Songwriting
malin  
27 Apr 2010 08:54 | Quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010
Norway
Karma
If I want to write a hit song in a specific music genre, what do I have to know about the genre? What should I think of?

Some people say I should analyse songs in that genre, but it hasn't been helping me a lot...I really want to take it to a professional level!

I guess I must know some kind of ''music theory'' or techniques, like typical song structure, themes, instruments, sound, scales, characteristics or something in that genre...Does anybody know of any good website who can teach me this? Are there any experts in here who can teach me? The genres I'm thinking about are: blues, jazz, gospel, soul, r&b, hip hop, reggae and any subgenres within these genres.

Remember, I'm a beginner, so don't get too advanced with me!:) I really want to get to a professional level though, so I appreciate all the help I can get! Thanks
adelaideguitar  
27 Apr 2010 10:37 | Quote
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Australia
Karma: 3
A great song has no genre. Thats what makes a great song.

Genres like (Metal, Soul, Blues, Pop, Jazz) are just a medium for a great story.

I loved johnny cash's version of nine inch nail's "Hurt".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmVAWKfJ4Go

Im sure everyone here can name a great song that covers all genres.

adelaideguitar  
27 Apr 2010 10:43 | Quote
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Australia
Karma: 3
Just for interest, here is wikipedias list of genres/styles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_music_styles

I remember a interview (I think with Jimmy Page), where he said that he knows a great song when it still sounds great on acoustic. I guess that view was the force behind the 90's many "un-plugged" albums.

But, then I had a ex-girlfriend that claimed that all great songs sounded great on piano, and therefore every musician should learn piano.

I still haven't learnt to hammer the black and white keys :-( Gezz, Im still trying to strum this dam guitar
malin  
28 Apr 2010 02:47 | Quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010
Norway
Karma
Okay, thank you so much!
Empirism  
28 Apr 2010 06:28 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
Karma: 35
adelaideguitar says:
A great song has no genre. Thats what makes a great song.!


Agreed, but it still categorized for one. Anyway, if you want to take your composing to professional level, I suggest that you start with one specific genre.

In every genre, there are common standards, that are used as well as instrument use than song structure. Others are more complicated than others. There are two ways, like you have been told to analyze (and listen much different artists on that genre) or by pure theoretical approach which is also possible, but its the more more harder road, but once mastered it paying back.

I know one guitarist that liked a much rhythms of senegalian music. He moved and lived 8 years in senegal to understand how culture is affected for development of local rhythm. See, that is dedication and learning. (thou, many have not possibilites as radical stuff) but you got the idea.

I think blues is theoretically easiest of genres you mentioned, but soulfully thinking, its the hardest. So in music and genres, there are many levels to think about if goin to get it to "professional level". I mean I can compose blues, I can play the blues... but do I have background or soul to play it professionally... hopefully someday.

Anyway, good luck
Empirism
adelaideguitar  
28 Apr 2010 09:19 | Quote
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Australia
Karma: 3
Irony is always a selling point for me. Ie, two arguments that counter conflict.

Or, you can be Justin Beebe, who I think should be run off the end of the earth, but f!, chicks love him.

So, maybe music is dead. Just put a child (16 yo male) face to digitally created music, and you have a hit.

God I hate that little **er
adelaideguitar  
28 Apr 2010 09:37 | Quote
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Australia
Karma: 3
Quote:
Agreed, but it still categorized for one. Anyway, if you want to take your composing to professional level, I suggest that you start with one specific genre.


Maybe. I can take "stairway to heaven" and make it jazz, metal or blues.

A genre is a tone. Its a attitude. Its a life style.

I never will pretend to be a blues player because I know those young men that created blues didnt create it for Australian white trash males like me. They created it from their life, and to try to recreate blues is just a clone.

Im sorry for being opinionated. I dont know. Great stories. Thats what I love. But, it seems music today is based on uter s h i t e.
malin  
29 Apr 2010 14:08 | Quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010
Norway
Karma
Hmm...It's interesting to read your point of views. :) I agree with both of you! As ''adelaideguitar'' said, a great song has no genre. But still, it's categorized for one. And somehow, I think it's easier for beginners to compose music if they have a specific genre in mind...I know that sounds weird, I mean, without genres you have no ''rules'' to follow, you can do whatever you want. Simple right? But that can also be confusing for some people...Maybe, I don't know.

But just because I'm curious, do you know how or where I can learn about the genres I mentioned above the theoretical way? :)

By the way, one comment to ''adelaideguitar'' posts: I totally agree with what you say, recreating blues is just a clone! It's about the true feeling and passion for blues, and the history behind it. As you said, a genre is a tone. Itís an attitude. Itís a life style. People without that, aren't real blues musicians. And itís not my intention to mess up with this music. Iím just curious about it. :)

BUT the reason why there are so many wannabe-blues-artists is because there are so many people who LOVE the blues music. So in one way, it's a positive thing. :) They don't want to mess with the music(even though thatís what theyíre might be doing), they want to show others how much they love it. Itís like their religion; those young men, who created it, are their Gods.

And yes, I canít stand the music of Justin Beebe either!
Phip  
29 Apr 2010 16:02 | Quote
Joined: 23 Dec 2007
United States
Lessons: 1
Karma: 45
Moderator
weeeeeelllllllll now I'm gonna jump in on the blues thing just to add a different perspective if I may (i'm gonna anyway)
If you've ever suffered, had your heart broken, lost someone you love, been stomped on one way or another by life I think you CAN sing, play and write the blues. If you have had that kind of pain in your life I think when you sing the blues it's not "cloning" but interpreting from personal experience. It can be just as powerful and "deep down" if it is heartfelt.
Phip
JustJeff  
29 Apr 2010 16:57 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 21
People like drama, that like listening to stories, and they like having their emotions slapped around like a... well you get the picture.

Tell a good story, give it something memorable, and you'll have a great song.


Rhythm, Repetition, and Melody.
malin  
30 Apr 2010 14:48 | Quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010
Norway
Karma
I think you misunderstood my point Phip, or maybe I just expressed myself in a wrong way. :) I absolutely DO agree with what you said! :) Music is about telling your story, discussing and expressing yourself. In that way, you can let go of those bad thoughts/experiences and move on, learn and grow as a human being, and remember all the good stuff in life. :) You put your soul and heart into the music when you compose. And when you feel that your song's doing its justice to your feelings, you have a deep soulful masterpiece, no matter what genre. There are many good blues musicians today who put there heart+soul into the songs, and they're not cloning the music, they're interpreting it, as you said:) Unfortunately, there are also some musicians who don't do this, they're just cloning the blues. THOSE are what I'm calling wannabe-blues-artists!;)
Thanks for your tips JustJeff!:)


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