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Fast Scale runs played through a chord progression

Technique
Reinhardt  
12 Apr 2010 07:49 | Quote
Joined: 22 Sep 2009
South Africa
Karma: 8
Any tips playing fast scale runs improvised over a chord progression? how to connect the dots so that the scale runs smoothly through all the chords ?
EMB5490  
12 Apr 2010 08:22 | Quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2008
United States
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well its the corresponding scale to the chord progression... you really need to learn theory for this one. for example:

if i play an "a minor" followed by a "d7" what key am i in? what is the tonal center? whats the parent key? and finally what scale would work over both chords?

these are the things you have to know.. ill tell you the answer once you have a go at it
Admiral  
12 Apr 2010 10:00 | Quote
Joined: 10 May 2009
Germany
Lessons: 1
Karma: 12
yeh, EMB is totally right, what you need for that is theory. You just can't get around the theory of harmonising chords, keys, scales, etc. Music is like a language, and for a language you need grammar(theory) and vocabulary(licks).
Reinhardt  
12 Apr 2010 10:16 | Quote
Joined: 22 Sep 2009
South Africa
Karma: 8
Nevermind with the help of some scale melodic patterns I got the hang of it abit.
EMB5490  
12 Apr 2010 14:11 | Quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2008
United States
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ok... i guess... i was just trying to help haha

btw it was an a dorian scale. key of a minor, parent key of g major. the d is the 5 chord which is major. however its the 4 chord if you look at it in perspective of a dorian, and if your in a natural minor d would be minor.

btw you should know the difference between the minor and its modes and maj and its modes
Empirism  
12 Apr 2010 15:01 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
Karma: 35
EMB5490 says:
btw you should know the difference between the minor and its modes and maj and its modes!


Have you any practical ways for it? Or what are your tricks to memorize or know them?
EMB5490  
12 Apr 2010 19:17 | Quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2008
United States
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you mean practical usuages of it or practical ways of learning it?

well it really helps and enhances your soloing.

like tell me,

a "minor" (aeolian) has a flat 3rd 6th and 7th.

the other 2 minor modes, dorian and phrygian have what notes flatted?

it helps with soloing and connecting your solos. and theory is soo important.
case211  
12 Apr 2010 19:55 | Quote
Joined: 26 Feb 2009
United States
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I don't think that theory should run a solo though. Or anything for that matter. Great stuff to KNOW, but it is THEORY not fact. Theory is more just a set of guidelines than "this always follows this".
Honestly though improv takes a bit of theory comprehension and understanding. Without it it would be very difficult to do improvisations.
Although theory has a good chunk of improvs, the biggest part by far that I have seen, is the player. You alone can make the music what you want, and put your spin and personality into it, so don't lose that special little lick or style because one note doesn't match up with the exact key(chromatics sound awesome when used in the right spots).
You + some theory + Technical ability= improvisations

*also, it really helps to learn where the notes are on the fretboard in all the different places. :D
EMB5490  
12 Apr 2010 20:00 | Quote
Joined: 10 Feb 2008
United States
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i disagree in a sense. what i teach is that, well first to a beginner i get them playing, learing the notes on the fretboard, and simple chords. then i teach the 5 chords and explain the small theory behind that and expand on theory. then once i feel they have a solid understanding of the theory i let them "break the rules" however when they improv. over chords, and they go "out of key" in a way, but i feel like they did it on purpose or just made a mistake i let it slidde. but if its a theory mistake i always correct.

however the key in theory is making scales sound like music, not scales. because thats all your truley playing. one form of some scale.
case211  
12 Apr 2010 20:56 | Quote
Joined: 26 Feb 2009
United States
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Karma: 24
Theory is important, I didn't mean to say that it isn't, I wanted to make the statement on my view that theory is more guidelines than rules. I hate being restricted as a player so I tend to use the theory that I know, and then do something a bit different with it. For example; A Minor chord is A E C. I like to take those individual notes and turn them into a progression of A E C(primarily 5th's because they sound better through the "wall" of distortion I like XD haha)
Then I like to try other odd things such as harmonizing the said progression and changing the key up a 5th(From A E C to D A G) and really just play around with different ideas that I have about something that might sound crazy haha

Making music is the fun part of music, whether one knows theory in writing or by ear.
By that I mean you may not know exactly what makes what in theory, but your ears may warrant you to know what sounds good and what may not(depends totally on the listener).
adelaideguitar  
14 Apr 2010 13:24 | Quote
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Australia
Karma: 3
It depends on the chord progression. If you have a very thick melodic (diatonic) chord progression then you really need to plan out your solo's since you will have a lot of "bung" notes to look out for.

If you have a progression based on 2 - 3 note chords then you have more flexablity. ie: If you have C major, there is nothing stoping you from playing any notes from the 3 major modes. Which is 9 notes.

The remaining 3 can be used to add colour to your solo by giving it exotic "eastern" sounds.

My advice is to record the progression and loop it. Solo over it for as long as possible. Try to find the notes that just dont work, and those that kick ass.

You also need to learn how to hide mistakes. ie: Make a mistake musical. Its all about attitude and always being on the ball.

Remember. For every bad note, on either side is a good one.
adelaideguitar  
14 Apr 2010 13:27 | Quote
Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Australia
Karma: 3
O, another tip. (Sorry for double posting)

When I was 18 I would spend hours improvising to the radio. What ever comes on, you _must_ play to. It doesn't matter if its music you hate or not. Just try to play something musical.

Overtime, you learn what works and what doesn't. And, you end up being prepared for that time when someone asks you to jam.


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