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Seeing modes on fretboard.

Music Theory
Empirism  
21 Oct 2009 11:29 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
Karma: 35
Now while Im studied these scales and modes. Ive noticed that "shape" in Dorian or any other mode is actually same depending on rootnote is it D, E, F anywhere on the fretboard, so how can I clear things and how should I start to looking these modes or "boxes" is maybe easier to me understand or get it into spine.

Is there any method to help memorizing these "shapes" in the "boxes" or is my only choise to memorize all? If you know what I mean. Thanks in advance

Other question I could put here is that I know there is an comment "experiment and play what sounds best to you", but what or any tip for the part of theory that I should study to actually know theoretically, what scale fits to certain chordprogression say C major, D minor and stuff like that, Im sure there is something.

Thanks for your time
Empirism
AlexB  
21 Oct 2009 12:29 | Quote
Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Mexico
Licks: 2
Karma: 23
I learned to play using boxes and shapes, and still play using them, I learned using the feetboard on the guitar pro software,there is a scale viewer too, so it was really easy to learn
case211  
21 Oct 2009 13:19 | Quote
Joined: 26 Feb 2009
United States
Lessons: 2
Licks: 6
Karma: 24
yeah, I almost did it backwards from you Emp. I learned the box shapes for mixo, major, pentatonic(Min, major) and then the last 2 years I've been gaining more of an insight to the common shapes of the scales. I love the box shape of the diminished scale with the root note being B at the high/low E string. Everything else I almost the same with, but, I have yet to learn all the box shapes for the modes(IE I don't know every shape of the Mixolydian mode yet).

I could honestly say that look at the root notes of your scale and then find the notes that succeed that note. Its how I learned, i just take say A Major, and I pick F# and run through the minor scale in a box shape then I go to say D# and learn that box shape and so on.
I don't really know how to explain how I do it very well, I'm just not too sure how to word it.

Another way that I've been using lately is learn all the notes up and down 1 string(open-12th fret) and then use what I said above so I know the shape from that position on the fretboard. made learning scales much much easier on me.

hope you can get some ideas from this
RA  
23 Oct 2009 04:10 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
there are methods to help organize the shapes and such(remember "CAGED" system), but as for getting them note by note, there is nothing to it but brutal work and memorization. There are books that can help(countless should say), but the only one I'm going to recommended are the one i have used and like. which is Ted greene's "Jazz guitar; single note soloing, volume 1"(Carl definitely has recs to[i think i remember him talking about Gilmore(?) series] so ask him for more opinions]. This book(and the countless others to there own extents) goes through each and every position/box/scale they can think of in there allotted space. But there not for the fate of heart, there not fun(unless your weird) in the formally sense of here is a little trick now go play and have fun, there pages of pages of notation(Ted's book is in Dots you maybe be able to find one good in tab but here an excuse to learn to read) and different fingerings(o yes to some boxes/positions you may have a **** load of fingerings[most not practical in more the one run]). And to really get all out of them you need to map out all the runs is gives you. for instances Ted will give you ten runs on D9, what you have to due it memorize the shape, the frets(so now you learning the fretboard which if you know how to read you should probably know), the name of the note(is it a D, F#, A, C, or E), and what interval is it(1,3,5,b7,9) which for guitar i think is the most important(i feel letters are more for the piano, but still need to be learn so we can talk). So this is not a willy e nilly type thing this requires serious time, so unless your willing i wouldn't waste the money(then again whats a little 10-20 bucks off the side for one time thing), and you can just go about memorizing as you play there is nothing wrong about that it makes you feel better. because using books this why takes a bit to "see results".
But case(you didn't buy the book i showed you did you?) pointed out a real good point to learn the modes on one string then you really get to "see" and "Hear" them like you would on a piano it helped me out to, but is does nothing for the fretboard organization/maze more of a head thing(which is more important)



as for theoretical application well your asking for a book of knowledge there is way to much info on that. each style has it's own little nick here and there(country's bass rhythm of roots and fifths[which inorganically or not like boss nova too]). So the best thing i could recommend is to get a good teacher and you can tackle both of these questions. but the next best thing is to start learning songs and different peoples takes on them and get into jazz(even if you only want to play rock, if Jimi Hendrix didn't like jazz he would of never gotten to be who he was). get your self a real book so you can see the structure of the songs. and get your self Mark Levine's "Jazz theory book". is will show you how to relate of this stuff. But marks book can't be used by it self he will just sate the scale in question might even have a notation of it, and tell you it's use in this place and then list jazz standards where it is also used that way so you need a real book and youtube(damn i love youtube best thing on the internet(sorry admin)

hope that what your looking for
Empirism  
24 Oct 2009 03:51 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
Karma: 35
Cool, Thanks for the hints and tips. Aye, thanks RA for the effort, really appreciate it. Teacher thing not just work for me just now, because I lack free time and band, guitar playing and music is just my hobby and way to forget everything else for a moment. Nothing more.

I have couple real books, and one DvD that have very good excercises. Yeah I used Gaged system very much, but I just want improve my "seeing" a bit more deep, that I can see more easily what notes I play (D, G, F#) everywhere on fretboard not just modes and scales you know. I definately check that Ted's book out.

Thanks again
Empirism
RA  
24 Oct 2009 04:17 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
have you try a three voice triadic approach it breaks down the fretboard into little three notes triads maybe that's what your looking for. Actually I'm fairly sure it is. maybe I'll write something up and scan it. I wouldn't count on it through it would be a lot work but I'll diffidently do it if I have another insomnia burst, but i gotta feeling I'm going to be crashing hard the next few days so it might be awhile. I'm diffidently going to bust out the colored pencils I'll relate it to the "CAGED" too.

it work for Jimi Hendrix, Larry Carlton, Les Paul, and tons of other why not us. I'll break down RHCP's "Snow" with them to.

but i could be getting carried away. damn I need to buy a new book a big one I'm thinking I'm going to start reading James Joyce big old 1,000 pager for 12 bucks.
Empirism  
24 Oct 2009 17:13 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
Karma: 35
Voice triadic approach...hmm...I dont know if I get it right (Funny, it actually didnt helped what I asked at first place, but helped me greatly with other things), but this feels good. I studied with chord name tool and found that there is easy shapes on minor and majors at higher strings.

I played chords with 3 higher strings and sounds really great. I found that there can be done 3 different styles depends on string with root note that are pretty easy fingerings. Very funky sounding. Again you made my day. I think I spend couple next month with these :P.

Cheers m8.
Empirism


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