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question about E minor scale

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simon73  
29 Dec 2006 10:19 | Quote
Joined: way back
Lessons: 8
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Hello
Hope that you can me with this question

I was playing today in Minor scale. I started in B then went to A, G, F# and finally to the back to E. Why did the B fit in so well with this scale as I have always started on a root note of the scale.

many thanks
Afro_Raven  
2 Jan 2007 12:25 | Quote
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United Kingdom
Lessons: 1
Karma: 20
Moderator
In any scale you play, there is a note in the scale called the dominant, and in the case of the diatonic scales (i.e. the major and minor scales) the dominant is the fifth note of the scale. The dominant note is the note whose own scale has the most in common with the scale you are already playing. That make sense? Probably not. Better explanation:

Notes in the E minor scale: E F# G A B C D
Notes in the B minor scale: B C# D E F# G A

Notice how there is only one note different? B minor has a C# instead of a C, otherwise it has identical notes to E minor. This is why B minor is a good scale to play after having played E minor. If you want to sound really clever about it, if you were to start off playing the E minor scale and then changed to B minor you have 'modulated to the dominant.' Hope this helps!
mightydave  
2 Jan 2007 13:09 | Quote
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Belgium
Karma: 2
nice afro_raven didn't know about this! thx
Afro_Raven  
4 Jan 2007 12:45 | Quote
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United Kingdom
Lessons: 1
Karma: 20
Moderator
No probs anytime, always ask Moonlit first - he seems to know what he's talking about.
mightydave  
4 Jan 2007 17:06 | Quote
Joined: way back
Belgium
Karma: 2
yeah i noticed that too! i still have lots to learn , and hopefully more this year !
simon73  
13 Jan 2007 12:57 | Quote
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Lessons: 8
Karma: 1
Thanks for your help


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