new transposer      circle of 5ths    wap


Chords...

Beginners
wufunk  
3 Jul 2009 00:57 | Quote
Joined: 29 Jun 2009
Karma
Hey, this place has been very very helpful along with the members, being outstanding. I'm trying to figure out chords...

I get intervals, etc. but I'm just wondering how to figure out how to construct a chord that has more than just three notes, aka a triad.

I kind of get the concept such as this...the C major chord...

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/index.php?ch=C&mm=&get=Get

It has C, E, G. But, how do you know on which string to use each note? Is there a pattern to it or is it just how it's suppose to be?

Also, is it so bad to use a chord that has JUST C, E, and G instead of three C's and an E and G...?
BodomBeachTerror  
3 Jul 2009 01:30 | Quote
Joined: 27 May 2008
Canada
Lessons: 2
Licks: 1
Karma: 25
when playing a C chord, it has the notes C E and G, and you can play those notes in any order and it will still be a C chord, as long as you dont add any other notes. to make it more than just the 3 notes, if you just play a normal C chord, you'll see on the A string is a C note, then on the D string you play an E, then the G string is open. so to complete the chord you just play the notes again, on the B string you play a C again, and the high E is open. so you play C, E, G, C, E. and if you can on the low E string you can add a G.

this might not be what youre asking at all
wufunk  
3 Jul 2009 02:58 | Quote
Joined: 29 Jun 2009
Karma
So, does the extra strings being used (the extra C and E in your example) just make the chord sound fuller? Meaning they're not really necessary?
league  
3 Jul 2009 03:21 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 10
Technically, a chord has three or more strings (or notes) playing simultaneously.

If there is a repeated note then yeah, its to make the chord sound fuller.

Remember there are variations of chords and different voicings that include or exclude some of the extra notes.

Chords can also be played as triads or three string chords.
wufunk  
3 Jul 2009 03:38 | Quote
Joined: 29 Jun 2009
Karma
Okay, both of you explained it great! Thank you for the very fast and informative replies.
RA  
3 Jul 2009 10:16 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
wufunk says:
I get intervals, etc. but I'm just wondering how to figure out how to construct a chord that has more than just three notes, aka a triad.


are you talking about extended chords or just more then three voiced triads? I'm just going to talk about triads I'm feeling lazy if you want that just tell me.

wufunk says:
It has C, E, G. But, how do you know on which string to use each note? Is there a pattern to it or is it just how it's suppose to be?


there is patterns and more patterns they seem to never end. Remember the "CAGED" system that is a pattern it in my opinion is the best harmonic pattern going and i think it's the first you should learn.


wufunk says:
Also, is it so bad to use a chord that has JUST C, E, and G instead of three C's and an E and G...?


As you stated before that you play the piano. While hears a knew difference in thought. As you know piano players general start my learning three voiced triads, to inversions, then move on to say four voiced triads(especially when the third's in the base). Guitar players general are quite the opposite. They learn chords with just the root in the bass for years for some. and the chords are triads but as you know there all Six, five, Four voiced triads. Then there power chords but where going to skip them for this talk as of now. Then they go on to triads. Which for the guitar Triad three voiced triads are another pattern for the guitar when studied to gather.


But over all your just started learning the guitar(right?) great that you know this stuff and want to know more, but it's best if you stop trying to look at the guitar as piano(latter in learning it's a must) and just take it as it is. Then when you get a feel for hit this stuff. just keep what ever theory you know from the piano and throw the rest out just for now to get your bearings.


but if you still wondering cause I can't be there in person...

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/CH-008-Triads.php
wufunk  
3 Jul 2009 16:28 | Quote
Joined: 29 Jun 2009
Karma
If you're following the CAGED system from the very first possible C Major chord, how do you form the second C major chord after you have done the first D?
RA  
4 Jul 2009 00:13 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
I'm little bit confused. Do you want the next diatonic chords after D that would be E minor? or the next C chord shape? which would be A grip.

of the C major chord
(C-Grip) http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/index.php?ch=C&mm=&v=0

(A-grip) http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/index.php?ch=C&mm=&v=2

(G-grip) This site doesn't have it in full so for understanding...
E--8
A--7
D--5
G--5
B--5
E--8

(E-grip) http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/index.php?ch=C&mm=&v=1

(D-grip) http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/index.php?ch=C&mm=&v=3

league  
4 Jul 2009 00:18 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 10
By GRIP do you mean Chord Shape?
RA  
4 Jul 2009 00:50 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
yeah
wufunk  
4 Jul 2009 01:57 | Quote
Joined: 29 Jun 2009
Karma
Ah, I have finally figured out how the CAGED system works, ...somewhat... I appreciate the replies.

I just get a bit confused that the CAGED system is all playing the C major chord, for example, but using the finger-positioning of either C,A,G,E, or D.

For some reason, I kept thinking that you play C Major, then A Major chords and so on, using the root of the chord instead of just the shape, meaning I thought it went C Major with C shape, then A Major using A as the root, and so on but it really just depends on the key you are playing in.

I am still a bit confused on how you throw together different types of chords other than just Major using CAGED, if it's even possible.

Can CAGED be applied to any scale such as minor? Like doing a chord progression that starts on a Major chord but then uses a minor?


Copyright © 2004-2017 All-Guitar-Chords.com. All rights reserved.