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Cross-draw Harmonica

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Crunch  
5 Mar 2009 17:22 | Quote
Joined: 31 Jul 2007
United States
Karma: 3
I recently purchased a Lee Oskar Natural Minor Harmonica with blues playing intentions. I think I'm supposed to play cross-draw (inhaling) on upbeats and normally on downbeats, but I'm not sure. Any advice on technique would be greatly appreciated.

p.s. This is a guitar website, but you guys are the most knowledgeable group for music I have!
blackholesun  
5 Mar 2009 17:26 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
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Moderator
Doesn't inhaling and exhaling give you different pitches?
jcb3000  
5 Mar 2009 17:36 | Quote
Joined: 09 Jul 2008
United Kingdom
Karma: 4
Correct, im not sure how much it changes the pitch by but im sure theres something about it out there on the internet
EDIT: had a quick look out of curiosity and the note changes up to the next note so say you blow a C you inhale on the same note itll play a D, next hole up you play an E then inhale would be a F for a harmonica in the key of C
blackholesun  
5 Mar 2009 17:39 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
Karma: 11
Moderator
The pitch increases to the next note in the scale when you go from exhaling to inhaling.
future_god_of_the_axe  
5 Mar 2009 21:10 | Quote
Joined: 29 Nov 2008
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 4
it doesn't matter at all if you exhale on the upbeat or down beat. you can play blues either way. but what i always say when im teaching people to play blues harmonica, is that you need to suck more than you blow. ha ha! what im saying basically, is that your inhale notes are your main notes your going to play. your exhale notes are basically your transaction between your inhale notes. im a harmonica MASTER, if you have ANY questions, ill be glad to answer them.
Crunch  
5 Mar 2009 22:17 | Quote
Joined: 31 Jul 2007
United States
Karma: 3
After messing around tonight I kind of came to that conclusion too. Using a little exhale as a passing note with the inhaled ones being the main body of your sound. Thanks for the help everyone.
Empirism  
5 Mar 2009 22:18 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Finland
Lessons: 4
Karma: 35
Cool!, I sometimes play harmonica for a change and the fun, I dont know much of it thou so can you clear couple myths.

First, which one you prefer. Plastic or wood inserts and how they affect to tone or resonance and is whichone easier to play or do it matter?

I know that there are different harps say F harp and E harp and so on... then I heard through the grapewine consept of crossed position. Whats that practically means? So my songs forexample are usually in C major, so If I play blues in C major, what harp I should choose? C, G or F or some other or do it counts?

I found most hardest thing that is bending notes... any tips? Should I bend notes when in inhaling or exhaling... or do it counts :P...

I might have couple later, but these came from mind now.

Cheers!
Empirism
Heather  
6 Mar 2009 06:52 | Quote
Joined: 21 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
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Karma: 19
Different harmonicas have different key tones. But inhaleing causes the tone to sound lower if my memorey serves me correctly. I think if you breathe out it sounds louder in that note.

I'll pick up the chromatic again I think, then my old tips could be better! :D Did you get a book with it? You can 'talk into the harmonica' say 'Toil' 'tat tat' or 'Tit-dit' for some nice train noises without vocalizing, you can do it breathing out or in. The books have some hefty tips.
jcb3000  
6 Mar 2009 13:18 | Quote
Joined: 09 Jul 2008
United Kingdom
Karma: 4
http://www.harmonicaclub.com/common/note_bending_for_harmonica.htm

just a random search came to this with the bending notes
blackholesun  
6 Mar 2009 13:47 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
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Moderator
It's been a while since I played one, but I believe you can bend notes by drawing your tongue to the back of your throat.


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