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Angry Chords

Technique
KurtCobain  
27 Nov 2008 20:34 | Quote
Joined: 27 Nov 2008
Canada
Karma
could anyone give me a list of really angry or depressing chords?
EMB5490  
27 Nov 2008 21:45 | Quote
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like diminishewd chords? or minor chords? try going at the minor chords. the chords along with the aeolian, dorian and phrygian modes and locrian is u want somthing really dark sounding.
JazzMaverick  
28 Nov 2008 13:49 | Quote
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"Angry" or "evil" chords depends on what you like. A Band I'd recommend to you would be "Necrophagist" if you want to see some real agressive stuff.

Basically chords like that are often "diminished" chords, and sad sounding chords are "minor" chords. It'll take time to understand this, but it'll help if you look at the chords section in this website.
KurtCobain  
29 Nov 2008 11:49 | Quote
Joined: 27 Nov 2008
Canada
Karma
thanks but the first comment I didn't really get
JazzMaverick  
29 Nov 2008 12:01 | Quote
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The Diminished part? Diminished is the name of a certain scale and chords, as is minor. They're names for chords which give certain styles and moods.
KurtCobain  
29 Nov 2008 13:19 | Quote
Joined: 27 Nov 2008
Canada
Karma
no I mean the other comment I understood yours and I checked some diminished chords they're cool
GRX40  
29 Nov 2008 20:07 | Quote
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Diminished or Minor chords can get an "angry sound".

I think diads (two-note chords) with much distortion sound pretty angry/heavy. These diads could be just your standard root-fifth power chords, or root-diminished fifth, root-minor thirds, etc.
KurtCobain  
30 Nov 2008 12:15 | Quote
Joined: 27 Nov 2008
Canada
Karma
is diminished fifth this symbol -5?
JazzMaverick  
30 Nov 2008 14:57 | Quote
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no. - stands for "flat" I've got a lesson showing people the chord symbols, you should check it out.
JoeDalton  
2 Dec 2008 05:55 | Quote
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What he means is that the modes aeolian dorian phrygian and locrian are minor scales, so the chords they represent are minor as well.

To get very expresive chords you can use their adds.
phrygian for example has a b2, dorian has a major 6, locrian has b5 and b2.

But whats more important than what chords you use is the context in which you use them.
It isn't a single chord that sounds depressing, it's the relation to the previous chord that really brings it out.
For example the C chord.
First lead into it from an Aminor then lead into it from a G, both times you will experience the C as a different chord.
blackholesun  
2 Dec 2008 08:05 | Quote
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A flattened 5th is a diminished 5th isn't it JM?
JoeDalton  
2 Dec 2008 08:32 | Quote
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Yes, but flat fifth is easier to say :P
The word diminished is often used for a more structural patern where as flat5 is used for the incidental.

Like in the full diminished chord you will usually refer to it as a dim5, but in an altered chord you will say flat5. Though (at least in my language) neither is mandate.
However since in dim chords it's usualy noted in symbols circle and cut circle, if you see -5 or b5 it's mostly in chords like G#9b5 for instance. If you see -5 you will probably say flat5.
blackholesun  
2 Dec 2008 09:23 | Quote
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I think it's really just a matter of notation and formality, which is beyond what the guy was asking. Diminished chords are hardly ever notatated with circles nowadays, in the same way the greek capital letter delta is hardly used for major 7th chords. They're too hard to reproduce quickly on a computer, so "dim" is used after the chord's root instead.

An interval of a diminshed 5th is just the same as a flattened perfect 5th which is the same as a tritone, they're all interchangable. You have to be careful with an interval of a diminished 7th though - it's not one semitone/half-step below a major 7th, it's two (one semitone/half-step below a minor 7th), which is enharmonically the same note as a major 6th, so in the key of C is it an A, but it's formally written as Bbb (B double flat) though.

As for finding angry chords, just mess around and experiment with chords, and use a fair bit of chromaticism (using whatever notes and chords you like, without much care for what key you're playing in!). Nirvana pretty much made a career out of it! :)
Heather  
2 Dec 2008 15:28 | Quote
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I think Am, Em, Fm6, G7, C and C7 can all sound angry and depressing, when they're put together I think it's a great constant mood swing of sorrow and mild anger. BUt that's me, we can all see it differently I guess.
JoeDalton  
3 Dec 2008 04:31 | Quote
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No, BHS. Forums and tab sites that is true, but reliable sources will still use the propper notation.

And yes Heather, that's right. All chords can be depressing. It's all how they are used.
blackholesun  
3 Dec 2008 08:13 | Quote
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JoeDalton says:
since in dim chords it's usualy noted in symbols circle


Yes, it's usually notated like that in text books, but in the day and age of the internet formal notation loses out to what is quick and easy, and what yields results - googling C won't get you anywhere, as google won't include the . It's so much easier to type Cdim than to go and find the symbol, and at the end of the day they both refer to the same 3 notes, so what's the problem in being a little bit informal and using dim instead?
JoeDalton  
3 Dec 2008 08:36 | Quote
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All of the discussed notations are 4 notes.
Dim means 1 m3 b5
Full dim which is the circle means 1 m3 b5 bb7
Half dim the cut circle is 1 m3 b5 m7

It's about it being faster to read, a lot of musicians sight read.
Which reads faster? Afull dim or Acircle?
Real musicians will always pick the notation that reads the easiest. It has nothing to do with formality.
blackholesun  
3 Dec 2008 08:59 | Quote
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Who said anything about sight reading? I think Adim is a lot easier to read than A because the small print could be read as a delta at a glance. A diminished 7th chord is just dim7, a half diminished 7th chord is m7b5.
JazzMaverick  
3 Dec 2008 09:02 | Quote
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It's kind of like kids never wanting to grow up. Tab is a really good starting point this day and age, but the new musicians seem to think that because they found something easier, they want to stick with the easier way of doing it. When they should start to walk on their own feet and understand notation.

It just depends on what you're doing, like Joe and myself, we have to learn notation because our style of music is nothing but notation.

But notation is so helpful, Tab is good and all, but it will never be able to tell you how long the note is, exactly when it's being played or anything about accidentals or modal changes (if used).

It's only a starting point. Even though it makes things a piece of cake, if you learn notation, everything will become even easier than you imagined.

I've said this a few times; life is generally difficult to get through and to learn, but we need to go through the hard times first before we can walk through with ease.

It just depends on the musician when it comes to things like A and Adim. it's down to preference, and personally I don't think it matters how they do it, as long as they can do it.
blackholesun  
3 Dec 2008 09:06 | Quote
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And who said anything about tab?! lol
JoeDalton  
3 Dec 2008 09:06 | Quote
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BHS I don't feel like this discussion will go anywhere. I'll drop it.
JazzMaverick  
3 Dec 2008 09:06 | Quote
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I like ranting :D
RA  
3 Dec 2008 13:27 | Quote
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Joe you really got to stop with all this crap. the fact of the matter is there is many different ways to state a chord. i got ten different theory books that all state them differently. and all of em have a page in the beginning that explains the way they do it. and if you want to get int picky the Berkley school of music text book would sated a Half diminished like black. there is many ways to state things in music there is no formality. arguing about it every time someone says something is purely idiotic. That and i believe even you said that a lot of the time it depends on whats is going on in the music at the time.
Heather  
5 Dec 2008 12:41 | Quote
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He asked for angry chords, not angry talk. Stop making matters tense people, advice was requested. This and anywhere else is not the place to deliver personal insults instead.
JazzMaverick  
5 Dec 2008 15:02 | Quote
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That conversation died a few days ago, Joe's also left the forum now.
Heather  
5 Dec 2008 17:40 | Quote
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Well, in that case before I shut myself up I'll just say Joe, if you're reading this at any point in time just consider coming back, okay? You really know your stuff about the guitar and your tips will be missed. But still if you don't want to that's fine, I'd still understand why.
JazzMaverick  
5 Dec 2008 17:46 | Quote
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It's 'cause he wasn't learning anything himself. He found another forum which is really helping him.


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