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solfegio(solfege)

Music Theory
casano  
22 Nov 2008 20:37 | Quote
Joined: way back
Karma
How do vocalists determine what key each Do (doh) is in? lets say there in the key of A and start off a scale by the doh in A ,but then what to sing a doh in the key of B how do they differentiate the difference do they need perfect pitch? because i tried to sing doh but then i dont understand how to sing a different doh all i can do is go an octave higher than the first doh but dont change key? this may be really simple to explain but i would like someone to help please.
RelaxedDude  
22 Nov 2008 22:41 | Quote
Joined: 26 May 2008
United States
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Karma: 3
With my experiance in choir, you sing the Do in whatever note you start in then progress up a step each time

Like, the difference between a Do in A and one in B is the pitch
JazzMaverick  
23 Nov 2008 09:56 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
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Yes, it's a matter of pitch. If you're going to sing you'll need to be able to sing in key anyway, otherwise it'd be kind of difficult to get approved as a singer.

It's basically the same in music, when you have root third fifth, this can be used in any key, but of course, you need to know the note which you are playing. Hope that cleared things up.
casano  
23 Nov 2008 17:44 | Quote
Joined: way back
Karma
yes but how to you change pitch instead of just going to a lower or higher octave of the same note? as a sung doh sounds the same to me only higher or lower in pitch how do you make your voice change key its tricky?
GRX40  
23 Nov 2008 18:02 | Quote
Joined: 20 Mar 2008
United States
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I would play a note on piano or guitar and try to match it with your voice. I'm not sure though, since I'm a bad singer. :(
JazzMaverick  
24 Nov 2008 15:32 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
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Karma: 47
Moderator
That's basically it, practice with the keyboard and/or guitar. You can't do it on your own, otherwise you'll train your voice to learn notes which aren't in key.

I have a lesson on singing tips if you want to check that out.
JoeDalton  
25 Nov 2008 02:39 | Quote
Joined: 15 Oct 2008
Karma: 1
Yeah mostly it's just match your voice to the note of a guitar/piano or whatever is available.
You don't need perfect pitch, that's not something you can learn, only relative pitch.
JazzMaverick  
25 Nov 2008 08:04 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
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Karma: 47
Moderator
I don't agree, Johan. It's possible to master your mind so you are able to have perfect pitch. There are many cases. Relative pitch is good, but you would naturally need to sing the note perfectly in order to be approved as a singer.

George Benson has perfect pitch, he sings whilst he's improvising on his guitar. So he's singing the same notes he's improvising.

I knew a retarded guy who naturally had perfect pitch. He could even tell the note the audience was making, the notes of the clapping... that's when you can say you've got perfect pitch, because you can tell what the note is even when it's not classified as a note.

I won't change your opinion on this; because we've both been taught differnt ways of understanding music. But I would just think it'd be weird to even have a title as "perfect pitch" if it doesn't exist in the first place.
JoeDalton  
25 Nov 2008 08:08 | Quote
Joined: 15 Oct 2008
Karma: 1
Perfect pitch is identifying a note without a reference.

Relative pitch is identifying an interval (perfectly (root is also an interval))

The retard who could identify a note without hearing anything else had perfect pitch.

George Benson used relative pitch.


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