new transposer      circle of 5ths    wap


books

Suggestions
les_paul  
2 Oct 2008 18:33 | Quote
Joined: 14 Feb 2008
United States
Lessons: 3
Licks: 2
Karma: 11
Can someone tell me a good book to learn up on theory?
baudelaire  
2 Oct 2008 18:43 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
http://www.amazon.com/Harmony-Melody-Diatonic-Elie-Siegmeister/dp/0534002455/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1222991015&sr=1-1
Ozzfan486  
2 Oct 2008 19:10 | Quote
Joined: 01 Oct 2008
United States
Licks: 1
Karma: 18
"The Theory Of Evolution" - Charles Darwin

lol. Just jokin' man I'm clueless haha.
RA  
2 Oct 2008 19:14 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
you always recommend that one book do you have any others because if you don't that is sad and might explain a bit too .

the best books are all in notation so i recommend learning that first. i did it with the Berkley text book "a modern method for guitar" volumes 1-3. but it requires a teachers help or a good understanding of basic theory first. a basic beginning book i can't give a personal recommendation because i taught basic theory to my self trough studying scales, chord formals, and the cycle of fourths and fifths. I have heard good things about "Harmony and Theory: A Comprehensive Source for All Musicians," by Keith Wyatt. but i haven't read it or see any of it give it a bit and i will ether of browsed through it or own it.
JazzMaverick  
3 Oct 2008 08:03 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
I bought that book already >:D

Do you want metal? or any style? In all honesty, if you were to learn some jazz stuff and merge it into metal, you'd definitely know what you were doing.

If you're interested in something like that I can recommend "The Jazz Theory Book". Very thick, and worth it.


There's also a program which is insanely helpful -no joke-

It's called "Music Theory 3.0" doesn't matter what style you're interested in, it covers everything.
RA  
3 Oct 2008 16:24 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
that's the "The Jazz Theory Book" by Mark Levine right. whats your opinion on it? does it really do what it says to give the be first book to truly teach you jazz? the only reason i haven't bought it is because it is a bit pricey to just throw down on and i am really tight on cash at the monument. I am just wondering if it is a must have book for a collection.

O and i second the best way to learn what to do is to learn jazz.
les_paul  
4 Oct 2008 16:56 | Quote
Joined: 14 Feb 2008
United States
Lessons: 3
Licks: 2
Karma: 11
I'm into southern rock, country, and I guess some metal.
baudelaire  
4 Oct 2008 17:18 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
Felix stalzers "structural hearing: tonal coherence in music" is a good one.
JazzMaverick  
5 Oct 2008 08:33 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Holy crap man, "The Jazz Theory Book" made me understand everything. (Yeah, it's by Mark Levine) My teachers were crap compared to what he was explaining, and in such detail!

I can't even explain how helpful this book is. I would gladly say that I'll probably never need another theory book, ever again. This book will keep me occupied for YEARS.

He's a realist; he explains that you actually need the will and desire to practice and you'll get no where without it. But what he goes on about in this book is insane. Some of it is still way over my head! I have so much to learn and I'm SOOO glad I bought this book.

Though, he expects you to know some degree of theory before you read this book. Just a heads up.

Try amazon, if you're looking to buy it cheap, I found it on there selling for about $20. Shame I didn't see that when I was looking. I bought mine for £40 or something... that's roughly $80. You win some, you lose some.


Also, if you're interested in Ear Training, I recommend Jamey Abersold's "Jazz Ear Training" book. Comes with a CD and goes through a lot of information, really easy to learn, too.

But again, he's a realist, and informs you that you're not going to have perfect pitch in a week; it literally takes years to master the notes.
sixtiesguy  
6 Oct 2008 08:45 | Quote
Joined: 11 Sep 2008
United Kingdom
Karma: 1
The finest all round guitar book I've ever used/read is 'The guitar handbook' by Ralph Denyer. At £17 it wasn't the cheapest book I've ever bought, but it's battered condition is a fine testimony to the number of times I've referred to it.
It's got a bit of everything from music theory to tabulation, practical playing tips to guitar maintenance, checking your electrics to mods, the list goes on..... I'd recommend it to anyone from beginners to advanced and even pro's for reference purposes.
JazzMaverick  
6 Oct 2008 11:21 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Not bad for £17! That'd be pretty awesome. I'm not a massive fan of tablature, but that's just me.

How long have you been playing for, SixtiesGuy?
sixtiesguy  
6 Oct 2008 14:23 | Quote
Joined: 11 Sep 2008
United Kingdom
Karma: 1
@ JM

43 years off and on but that doesn't mean I'm any good, just that I haven't made the best use of my time!
JazzMaverick  
6 Oct 2008 14:49 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Nothing wrong with that man, at least you've joined this site. Everyone will help you out.

Do you have any of your songs/jams/mess abouts on your computer? Wouldn't mind hearing them if you do.
sixtiesguy  
7 Oct 2008 08:46 | Quote
Joined: 11 Sep 2008
United Kingdom
Karma: 1
@JM Kind of you to offer but I have no ambitions to be the next 'axe-master'. I know what I know and I know what I have to do if I wish to improve, but a man at my time of life and in my condition is (generally) happy to just 'kick back and whittle some' as some of our American friends might say. I just like the 'crack' of talking with other guitarists and beginners and offer advice if and when (necessary or requested).
Regarding songs/jams etc, this is where I AM a new boy. I've just purchased a little Boss digital recording studio (8 track) with a built in drum machine, stereo mike's etc, and when I've got the hang of it I intend to do a few covers of my old favourites (from the fifties & sixties of course!)If they come out OK and I don't feel as if I'm showing myself up too much, I might decide to upload one or two, I'll just have to see how it goes.
JazzMaverick  
7 Oct 2008 13:02 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Ah that's pretty cool! I'm not intending to be a performer, but perhaps one day a film/game composer. Who knows?

Ohhh I love that Boss machine. When you do record those, definitely put them on here, that'd be awesome. I love music from the fifties and sixties.
kellenman  
7 Oct 2008 16:04 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jul 2008
United States
Karma: 3
i took a look at this post the other day, and went to the library and found none of the books you guys suggest, so i picked up a book called This is your Brain on Music by Daniel J. Levitin. Im only about 50 pages in to it but it seems pretty cool. Its mostly about how science is related to music, containing a bit of theory from what i have read so far. If anyone has read it already you should tell whether or not im wasting my time.
JazzMaverick  
7 Oct 2008 16:17 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
I looked at that book once, actually seemed really interesting. Though I forgot what it was called so couldn't buy it. Thanks for reminding me.

The books that Baudelaire and I posted are definitely online. But I know mine definitely isn't in stores.
RA  
7 Oct 2008 17:03 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
yeah you can't find good music books anywhere. all the libraries have in my area have nothing at all. barnles and noble carries a lot but you have to have them order it few you. (don't really know how that works out i just said never mind) and the books at guitar center and other music stores are all TAB books and i have no use for those. i just go on hear say and recommendations i find online and but the off amazon and hope for the best. on the plus side all of ted greene's books (don't know if single note 1 or 2 are cause i don't have em yet) are in the library of congress.
JazzMaverick  
8 Oct 2008 05:54 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
I personally hate TAB it's limited and sets people's minds to think that that's all they'll ever need to get by in the music world… When they'll unfortunately fail if they keep at it.

I encourage everyone to train their ears and try reading notation. It will help SO much.

If anyone wants any notes on that I recommend getting the books;

"The AB Guide To Music Theory" Part I and Part II.
It's by Eric Taylor and it's known to be the new best book for teaching music theory. When I say this kind of music theory, I mean notation, yet there are still things in there that would help anyone out, even if they're not interested in notation.
macandkanga  
8 Oct 2008 19:48 | Quote
Joined: 03 Oct 2008
United States
Karma: 21
The Heavy Guitar Bible
I have tons of guitar books as I am self taught but this book is the first book that after reading the first page i continued on for days without even picking up my guitar. I learned about theory without even knowing it. It's on Amazon for about 20 US bucks.
JazzMaverick  
9 Oct 2008 06:01 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Ohh yeah, I head about that book. What's it say inside? Give us a review please. :D

I bought the book Baudelaire recommended. Harmony and Melody by Ellie Seigmeister. HOLY CRAP. It's amazing. Now that book, is worth it. You know what was hilarious though, I bought the book on Amazon for about £12 something, and when I get it I look at the spine and there's a price tag saying $1.15!!! What a con. Ah well, it's amazing none the less.

I still think "The Jazz Theory Book" Is better, but Ellie actually fills some holes which Mark Levine didn't mention. Different experiences I would say.
kellenman  
9 Oct 2008 17:52 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jul 2008
United States
Karma: 3
JazzMaverick says:
I personally hate TAB it's limited and sets people's minds to think that that's all they'll ever need to get by in the music world… When they'll unfortunately fail if they keep at it.


i dont know if this is true but i heard somewhere that jimi hendrix never learned to read notation. However, i do agree with you, i just wanted to point out that jimi did it if my source is correct.
RA  
9 Oct 2008 19:26 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
knowing how to read notation is not really the most important thing to know. It helps you incredibly (by letting you "see" music) but it is much more important to know theory. i know a few people who can sight read well beyond me (i quite suck at it. it is easy to out sight read me, need to practice) and many others but when i start saying theoretical concepts they just fall apart. but if you self- taught you kind of need it. Jimi got away with what he did because he was surrounded by so many great musicians and they taught him so much by him listening and showing him tricks. he might not of fully understand what he was doing but he was going well beyond just simple rock and roll
JazzMaverick  
10 Oct 2008 08:11 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
He did it by ear and feel, not by TAB, Kellenman.

RA, I totally agree with you, I'm not saying you must learn how to read it though.

Theory is by far the most important, otherwise you'd get no where. But it'll help so much just learning it.
RA  
10 Oct 2008 09:00 | Quote
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
United States
Karma: 16
@jazzmaverick - when you got "Harmony and Melody," by Ellie Seigmeister you got it used right? was it in good shape i am kind of skeptical of buying used over the internet seems sketchy to me.
JazzMaverick  
10 Oct 2008 11:39 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Old book, pages are yellow with age, but the condition was fine. There was a tiny stain on the back page but nothing to pull a fuss over. It was a lot bigger than I thought it would be, which I'm pleased with - means there's more to read. :D

If you end up getting a book that's used and not what the description says, you're entitled to get your money back, if they refuse, their account will be removed and they'll still have to pay you for it.
kellenman  
10 Oct 2008 15:44 | Quote
Joined: 23 Jul 2008
United States
Karma: 3
hey, i just read through page 100 of This Is Your Brain on Music, and i think its pretty interesting and very educational for how little knowledge you need, and how little consontration it takes to understand what Daniel J. Levitin is talking about. If you want to learn how Biology and Music combine, and how/why a composition can be written to spark interest or give emotion to listeners at certain moments, and if you dont want to spend hours trying to understand like i do on many lessons i find on here, read This Is Your Brain on Music by Daniel J. Levitin
MetaLHeaDDevil84  
16 Jan 2009 21:21 | Quote
Joined: 10 Jan 2009
United States
Karma
The best book I've ever seen for music theory (among a plethera of other guitar related concepts) Has to be "The Guitar Handbook" I'm not sure who the auther is, but it is an amazing book. It has everything from music theory to maintenance, stage setup, to recording. GREAT GREAT book. It's a blue book with 3 guitars on the cover.


Copyright © 2004-2017 All-Guitar-Chords.com. All rights reserved.