new transposer      circle of 5ths    wap


rootmovementsrootmovementsrootmovements

Music Theory
baudelaire  
26 Sep 2008 00:57 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
you know how you read something, and you're like, uh huh, yeah, yep. got it. but you DON'T have it, you just sort of know it while no real comprehension exists? and then one day, BAM! it all comes clear?

well, i just 'got' root movements and how to use them... god, why did i not see this earlier?

listen, study root movements! apply them, listen to chopins BRILLIANCE in applying them, they're so powerful.

a great root movement can take a melody and transform it into a powerful emotional fireball.

i was just listening to andrea anticos "S Il focho In Chui", a frottola, and i heard it: I - II - III - IV - III - VI - V - VI - V - I. the root movement is what gives the (as i now realize) somewhat uninteresting melody it's elegance and power!

these are really the KEY of rhythm guitar playing, i can see how the master guitarist like hendrix and buckethead and hammet and halen use them to make such powerful rhythm pieces... i have to go listen to a bunch of music to understand root movements now, but really! go learn about them, so in a month or so their gravity will hit you!
league  
26 Sep 2008 09:24 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 10
Do you mean changing the root while keeping the same melody?
JazzMaverick  
26 Sep 2008 09:24 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
I love it when things suddently makes sense. That burst of knowledge hits you. Glad you shared your epiphany, too. Most of my friends never do.

How often do you practice? If you don't mind me being nosy.
JazzMaverick  
26 Sep 2008 09:25 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Keep the same root note, just resolve on the root.
baudelaire  
26 Sep 2008 11:12 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
no, i mean the relative force of different root movements... falling fifth, falling fourth, falling third, rising second, falling second and rising third.

the way that these can be utilized to create powerful harmonic meaning... or a weaker one can be gracefully used to make a gentle movement.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fa_NWK_nEo

can you hear the chord changes? listen carefully: it's V I V I V I II V I, or falling fifth, falling fourth, falling fifth, falling fourth, falling fifth, falling third, falling fifth, falling fifth, falling fifth. that's the beauty of the piece! listen to it, do you hear a really special melody? no!

oh shit the doors! they do it to compliment jims haunting melodies to create a graceful "crystal ship" or powerful "five to one" harmonic sledgehammer!

JazzMaverick  
26 Sep 2008 11:54 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
oh yeah, I get you now. Interesting analysation, Baudelaire. I'm going to look into that more.


Copyright © 2004-2017 All-Guitar-Chords.com. All rights reserved.