new transposer      circle of 5ths    wap


Am-7, G/B & B WRONG!?!?

Technique
Heather  
21 Sep 2008 17:09 | Quote
Joined: 21 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Licks: 2
Karma: 19
Okay, I STRONGLY have my doubts that those chords on this site are wrong, I mean this place seems so reliable, only I got confused when I mastered myown techniqe including them, only for my main music teacher to say they were wrong? I'm sure they're not, he now wants me to learn a new routine containing G, C & D strums which I don't want to redo just because he think's they're wrong when I got so good. you guys reckon I should show him the site to correct him?
JustJeff  
21 Sep 2008 17:56 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 21
Standard G, C, D chord progression should go as follows:

G = 320033
C = x32033 // x32010
D = xx0323

Am7 = x02010

G/B = x20033

B = x13331
BodomBeachTerror  
21 Sep 2008 18:02 | Quote
Joined: 27 May 2008
Canada
Lessons: 2
Licks: 1
Karma: 25
D = xx0232
baudelaire  
21 Sep 2008 19:49 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
just jeff, that is a poor way for a 145 progression to be implemented... the soprano should, in the basic form of the progression, always be the tonic... it's the root tone that should remain constant and be a divergent note, in order for the progression to be smooth and clearly defined. just pointing that out.

the chords on this site are not wrong. regardless of how your teacher told you to play the chords, there are innumerable other ways to do it.
JustJeff  
21 Sep 2008 21:24 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 21
Sorry about the d chord. Made a typo when putting it down. Should of actually read what I was typing.

Of course the bass note wants to change the least: however, have you looked at rock music at all? Most rock music of today's standards, especially pop, follows a much simpler type of progression. In classical standards, yes: the 145 progression presented above does not follow traditional rules.

For example, Green Day songs do not do many inversion of chords, nor do they follow classical rules of the 4 voices.

If you want a real shocker, most music in today's standards break the simple rule of consecutive perfect 5ths in parallel. And the most common form of chord, the power chord, breaks the obvious rule of including the 3rd of the chord. And don't even get me started on the actual progression: some songs don't follow any rules classically whatsoever.


The point here is, this is not classical studies. If he wanted to know how Bach would play chorales on guitar, he would of asked. However, what he was asking for was the chords for G, C, and D. That is what I gave him: the open forms of the G, C, and D chords.

There aren't even four voices in these chords: there are octaves of notes being played on top of the 4 voices. For example, there are 6 voices in the G chord: 3 of which play the G (Which is good), 1 plays the B, and the other 2 play the D.

To then analyze where to go with a C chord, we would try to keep the ratio of notes the same: Most being on the root, and least being on the 3rd: and if possible not double the 3rd. This does not happen with the open C chord. When playing x32010, we are given 2 C's, 2 E's, and only 1 G. This is classically incorrect. The only way we could change this is if we inverted it, however that makes it even worse since we will have to change the fingering incredible.


As you can see, classical guitar is not made for beginners if we want to follow classical rules.


Not everything has to be perfect. As long as we understand the basic fundamentals of music we're fine.
RelaxedDude  
21 Sep 2008 21:39 | Quote
Joined: 26 May 2008
United States
Licks: 2
Karma: 3
The four voices are the root, 3rd, 5th, and 7th? And why doesnt the 145 progression not follow traditional rules?

(just trying to learn)
baudelaire  
21 Sep 2008 21:41 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
no, everything has to be perfect, and if that's not your attitude you should sell your instruments.

it's not about different schools or what is common; certain methods sound better.

xx5433
33201x
x5423x

is something how a 145 in G should appear, supposing you aren't harmonizing anything, just putting down some chords. it sounds better, and is more open ended. there are more possibilities.

you said they SHOULD go as you said; that's ridiculous, they should go as you said if that is what the melody calls for, but not as a basic outline.
JustJeff  
22 Sep 2008 07:02 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 21
The four voices are represented by the soprano (highest), alto (high), tenor (middle), and bass (low). A chord has 3 notes, consisting of the 1st, 3rd, and 5th. Therefore, one of these notes has to get doubled when building a 4 voice chord. Usually this is the root, or the 5th, and will be put in the soprano.

And no, not everything has to be perfect Baudelaire. If we wanted perfectionism, we would never want to listen to a human play a musical piece. We are not perfect.

Shouldn't you bar the D chord to be 25423x? That way you keep the bass from jumping a 5th and keep it in contrary motion of the other voices?
JazzMaverick  
22 Sep 2008 08:41 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
I'm amazed your teacher says it's wrong... Seems he still has much to learn. Is this guy teaching you at your school? Does his name happen to be Paul?

A guitar teacher at my old school knew nothing, yet he was still a teacher there. He taught all the wrong chords and how to play songs which were all wrong. So, it was a waste for everyone. Shame they never found out. Of course, at the time, I didn't know that he was wrong.
baudelaire  
22 Sep 2008 10:43 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
you could do that, but that jump is fine for coming home.

i was really only objecting to the static high tone.
JustJeff  
22 Sep 2008 11:42 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 21
If you are talking about the static G, my theory professor always said that the simplest solution is usually the best solution. It may not be interesting to listen to, but it follows all the rules.

And by the way, your progression has parallel octaves on the A and B strings. Even that's not perfect >.
JazzMaverick  
22 Sep 2008 12:19 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
So, what on earth do you guys mean, when you talk about "static"?

Some things I know, some things I don't. Not afraid to ask.
blackholesun  
22 Sep 2008 12:39 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
Karma: 11
Moderator
Static means not moving/changing, it's referring to the G on the top E string in both the C and the G chords.

Personally I don't see what all the fuss is about, or even what the original question was.
JazzMaverick  
22 Sep 2008 13:16 | Quote
Joined: 28 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Lessons: 24
Licks: 37
Karma: 47
Moderator
Ah, now I get you guys now. I personally get bored of sticking around the same area, I like to venture around. Makes it more entertaining. :D
Heather  
22 Sep 2008 14:26 | Quote
Joined: 21 Aug 2008
United Kingdom
Licks: 2
Karma: 19
No, his name's Ben. I've just gotton confused on who to trust as I'm confident this place (where I got most of my chords) is reliable, but so is my main music teacher. I was wondering for perhaps a double check these chords are right which I'm sure they are, I've had no problem while learning my sequence for this country song despite my begginer status and the whole song just came natural for me. I've mentioned the song more than once here 'drinkin' me lonely' when it's played all together with the chords my teacher had no objections with sounds great atually.

It was just the actually lone chords listed he did'nt like, not the progressions I used and he did'nt like them because he said G/B don't exist and Am-7 from here's not right, but I did'nt know what to think as I trusted both him and here. resolved now anyway, my guitar teacher came back today and said they're accurate...phew!


Copyright © 2004-2017 All-Guitar-Chords.com. All rights reserved.