new transposer      circle of 5ths    wap


new chord progression.

Songwriting
joe  
1 Sep 2008 19:15 | Quote
Joined: 20 Aug 2007
United Kingdom
Karma: 1
dont shred me to pieces but i have a new chord progression im working on.

so far its

[ G / / / / ] [ B7 / / / / ] [ Em / / / / ] [ Dsus2 / / / /]
[Em / / / / ] [ D / / / / ] [ Cadd9 / / / / ] [ D / / Dsus4 / D / ]

and then repeat.

constructive criticism please?
baudelaire  
1 Sep 2008 19:29 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
do you know how to work with bebop scales? because that's what that is...

I-II-VII-V-VII-V-IV-V.

i'd keep the 7's before the 5 short, only one stroke, and you'd better resolve it fast or it'll sound like shit, whatever melody that accompanies or whatever. but the 12545 is a common progression, so you can find plenty of examples to study in any time period or style of music. any 145 melody will sound fine with it, since 2 is practically 4 anyways. use secondary triads predominantly, so you can work with the 7's easier and to make it less boring.
joe  
1 Sep 2008 19:53 | Quote
Joined: 20 Aug 2007
United Kingdom
Karma: 1
no i have no clue whatsoever with bebop scales :/ but im guessing thats something to do with the added D# in the B7 chord?

cheers for the feedback. it does sound better just playing one Em.

however dont understand all this "any 145 melody will sound fine with it, since 2 is practically 4 anyways. use secondary triads predominantly, so you can work with the 7's easier and to make it less boring."

could you try and simplify that a bit??

baudelaire  
1 Sep 2008 23:19 | Quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Brazil
Karma: 2
the 1st, 4th and 5th degree of a scale are the primary triads. most popular music is based off these. the 2nd, 6th and 3rd have all but one tone in common with the 4th, 1st and 5th respectively. these are the secondary triads. they can be substituted for one another with very little variation in the actual sound. for example, try playing, C, E, G. then try play, Am, E G. they sound almost the same - because C and Am are the 1st and 6th of C major.

so what you have is 1 2 5 4 5. the 2 is ALMOST a 4; your melody and harmony sound very, very little different from the standard 1 4 5, except in this case, its 1 4 5 4 5. very basic; except you go to the 7th degree of the scale before each 5. now, because that first 4 is actually a 2, that sets you up for a very smooth transition to virtually any point of the scale; meaning, the 7th, a difficult degree to gracefully work with, can be easily dealt with, if you use the possibilities the secondary triads afford you. you already have a 2, now let the melody spring off of that, and meet the 7th in midair.

if you just use that normal 1 4 5 harmonized melody, it will work, but without any grace or real beauty. it'd be cloddy. using the secondary triads will let you really bring out the depth of the 7th degree, and it's various dissonances can be easily turned into a very piquant handful of resolutions.
league  
2 Sep 2008 18:10 | Quote
Joined: way back
United States
Lessons: 2
Karma: 10
I also have a chord progression that needs deciphering. It goes:

Am// Am7// Em// A// G// G7/ Am// THEN IT REPEATS its pretty simple but I was wondering if I could add or change a chord to make it less boring?


Copyright © 2004-2017 All-Guitar-Chords.com. All rights reserved.