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Let Me Get This Right

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NCFC91  
15 Jul 2008 05:04 | Quote
Joined: 11 Jul 2008
Karma
For example the chords in the Key of A are,

A, Bm, C#m, D, F#m, E and G#m7b5.

Is that all of them?

and does this mean that for example you could include Bm7 as a variant becuase Bm is in the key of A?

Thanks
blackholesun  
15 Jul 2008 13:35 | Quote
Joined: 04 Jan 2007
United Kingdom
Licks: 1
Karma: 11
Moderator
Yes, that's all of the chords.

You could include Bm7 because the minor 7th of B is an A, which obviously is in the key of A.

You couldn't include Bmaj7 because the maj7th of B is A#, which isn't in the key of A.

You can do the same thing for each chord. Major chords go to maj7, or in the case of the dominant chord (E in the key of A) it becomes an E7 chord.
JustJeff  
15 Jul 2008 14:44 | Quote
Joined: way back
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Lessons: 2
Karma: 21
Actually... you could use Bmaj7, it can be referred to as the V7/V, or the 7th chord of the fifth note of the fifth note in A.

This is because the key of E (Or the fifth note) has the following chords:

E, F#min, G#min, A, B, C#min, D#dim

Since B is there, you can use the dominant 7th of the B, and lead that to the E, making E now your new home.

You can try something like this:

A, D, Bmaj7, E, repeat

Where
A = x02220
D = xx0232
Bmaj7 = x21202 or x24242
E = 022100 or 242452


The power of music!
foogered  
15 Jul 2008 17:12 | Quote
Joined: 30 Apr 2008
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Hurray for secondary dominants!
bodom  
16 Jul 2008 17:11 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Lessons: 4
Karma: 5
Nope! you can't use the Bmaj7 and still be in the Key of "A". If you use Bmaj7 then you are switching Keys.
And no this is not "ALL" the chords in the Key just the basic triads.
foogered  
16 Jul 2008 20:17 | Quote
Joined: 30 Apr 2008
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Its called a secondary dominant. Its a chord diatonic to the key of the fifth. There are also secondary leading tones. Typically they're used in cadences, or to more smoothly transition between chords, but theycan be used to change keys.

For example to modulate to the key of the iii, you'd play the V, then a iii/V7, then a iii (which would now be analyzed as a i chord).

I may not be remembering this 100% correctly, but its basically right.
bodom  
17 Jul 2008 16:22 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Lessons: 4
Karma: 5
yeah but he isnt asking how to change Keys he is asking will he still be in the same Key...which he wont be.
foogered  
17 Jul 2008 17:02 | Quote
Joined: 30 Apr 2008
United States
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Sure he will be. It's a secondary dominant in the key of A. :P

I understand he wasn't asking how to change keys, I was supporting what JustJeff said. I just thought I'd throw the theory in behind it all, so that he could understand why they're there.
bodom  
17 Jul 2008 20:04 | Quote
Joined: way back
Canada
Lessons: 4
Karma: 5
Let me ask a question.
This is going to be simple.

Is E major in the Key of C?

Answer.....No its not.

"This isnt directed at anyone, I just see lots of this on the forums."

One of the biggest problems people have learning online/forums is sorting through all the unnessasary information in order to get to thier answer. They end up getting more/different questions from the answers people give. Try and keep in mind that people are just learning this stuff and maybe they dont need all this info at once. KISS... Keep It Simple Stupid.

@foogered
He is clearly asking about chords in relation to the Keys..(what chords are in the given Key)
By saying yes, "Sure he will be. It's a secondary dominant in the key of A. :P" You are making him/her(sorry didnt check the profile) think that they can use Bmaj7 and still be in the Key of "A", which is false. Secondary dominants are used to help change the tonal centre/chord, this does not mean they are in that Key!
secondary dominants are "NON-DIATONIC"(Non/Not-notes in the scale of the Key)dominant chords... Its like a way to step outside the Key then back into it.



foogered  
17 Jul 2008 20:20 | Quote
Joined: 30 Apr 2008
United States
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Karma: 9
Darn, that's true. Thanks for correcting me.


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