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Comments:

01
08.04.2007
  yablon

a quick question. would it be correct to say that Metallica's Nothing else matters, is in the key of Em. and that Em = Gmajor?

02
08.04.2007
  Guitarslinger124

I wouldn't go so far as to say that they are equal, simply because E natural minor has a different sound than G major. But yes, in a sense they are equal... E natural minor is the relative minor to G major...which means that technically they are in the same key because they share the same notes...to find the relative minor of any major scale count three half steps back.

03
08.08.2007
  Afro_Raven

Nice lesson, except that there is one fundamental thing wrong with it...
The whole point behind a power chord is that it is made up of only the root and fifth, NOTHING ELSE! Here you have talked about the A minor/A major power chords - there's no such thing! The interval that makes a chord major or minor is its third, major chords have a major third, minor chords have a minor third. period. The reason power chords are so called is because their lack of a third makes them sound much more powerful when played through a distorted amp. So you cannot have a minor or major power chord - it has no third so there is no way to distinguish what it is. The chords you talk about above would simply be A minor or A major chords. Other than that, bloody good lesson!

Afro

04
08.08.2007
  Guitarslinger124

haha...good point...but whats the fun if you always follow the rules? hehe...you are right though...

05
10.15.2007
  Davo

E is the relative minor to G, but that does not make the notes, or the chords Em and G, enharmonically equivalent... "equivalent" usually means identical. Such as A# and Bb are enharmonically equivalent because they are actually the same note...

unless you meant something else by that.

06
10.15.2007
  Guitarslinger124

not only is E natural minor the relative minor to G major, but it is also the aeolin (i know obvious right?), but the modes of a major scale are the same notes just using a different starting point....so they are the same notes...G major- G, A, B, C, D, E and F#. the next mode is A Dorian-A, B, C, D, E, F# and G....just as E aeolian is-E, F#, G, A, B, C and D...so they are the same notes....

07
10.25.2007
  REDSTRAT

WITH ALL TABS NOW THESE YOUNG GUYS HAVE NEVER SEEN SHEET MUSIC.GUITAR WORLD NEEDS REGULAR SHEET MUSIC TOO.GUITAR FOR THE PRACTICING MUSICIAIN HAD SHEET MUSIC AND TAB.ARE THEY STILL AROUND.

08
10.26.2007
  Guitarslinger124

guitar one still uses staff, and vic juris and keith wyatt use staff in their guitar world columns...when talking about music in general, sheet music is common language that is definitely very good to understand. however, this site is catered mostly towards guitarists, in my opinion, and tablature is pretty much the standard nowadays...but good luck with your revolution to bring back sheet music!

09
07.10.2008
  TK

The main difference between say A minor and C major is the chord progression. Alot of music uses a very standard progression for it's chords. I-IV-V progressions. This is where the difference in sound/feeling you get from the music.

Using the above example, C major is a very powerful, almost cheerful feeling chord progression (C-F-G) while shifting the exact same song to A minor (A-D-E) will make the song sound more emotional... depressing in a way.

Been a LONG time since I delved into music theory (16 years) so I may be off on the exact chord progression (I can't remember the exact order of the I-IV-V chord progression...)

10
12.30.2010
  2jpe2

just transcribe the tabs to sheet music, it takes 10 minutes, I do it when I play guitar parts on piano

11
12.30.2010
  nullnaught

I thoght you did not need the octave for a power chord. Just the 1 and 5. Is that right?

12
12.30.2010
  Guitarslinger124

That is correct, I just think it sounds better.

13
12.30.2010
  nullnaught

i agree



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